Court of Appeal rules on police duty to suspects in detention – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In a recent judgment, the Court of Appeal held that where a criminal suspect is remanded in custody, Article 5 of the Convention requires the police to notify the court as soon as possible if there is no longer a reasonable basis for suspecting them. It also held that the police and CPS must aid the court in observing its duty to show ‘special diligence’ in managing a suspect’s detention, by investigating the case conscientiously and by promptly bringing relevant material to the court’s attention.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 27th February 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Landlords shunning foreigners because of their accents, after new rules preventing illegal migrants from renting – The Independent

‘Landlords are preparing to turn away tenants just because they have a foreign accent, as a consequence of new rules making it an offence to let rooms to illegal migrants.’

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The Independent, 15th February 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Code of practice for police and border officials on seizing travel documents – Home Office

Posted February 13th, 2015 in codes of practice, immigration, passports, police, search & seizure by tracey

‘Code of practice for officers exercising functions under Schedule 1 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 in connection with seizing and retaining travel documents.’

Full code

Home Office, 13th February 2015

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

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Hayley Hooper: The Counter Terrorism and Security Bill: A Potential Further Erosion of Citizenship Rights in the UK – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted January 29th, 2015 in bills, citizenship, human rights, news, passports, terrorism by sally

‘The Counter Terrorism and Security Bill was introduced into the House of Commons on 7 January 2015 using a semi-fast-track procedure. The Bill provides for new powers to seize travel documents from individuals suspected of terrorism, for increased powers to retain internet data under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA), and more intrusive measures under the Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Act 2011. This comment focuses on one aspect of the Bill: the “temporary exclusion orders” (TEOs) proposed in Chapter Two. These TEOs would allow the Home Secretary to make an executive order to invalidate an individual’s passport whilst s/he is abroad if there is “reasonable suspicion” that s/he has been involved in terrorism or terrorism related activity outside of the United Kingdom. Such orders may remain in force for up to two years. This means that affected individuals can only return to the UK if they become the subject of a “managed return” during which they may be subject to conditions consistent with obligations in the existing Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Act.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 27th Janaury 2015

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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A worrying new anti-terror law is sneaking through Parliament – The Guardian

‘As the world’s press and public stand vigil in support of Charlie Hebdo and the families of the victims of Wednesday’s attack, we wake this morning to reports that our security services are under pressure and seeking new powers. The spectre of the Communications Data Bill is again evoked. These reports mirror renewed commitments yesterday to new counter-terrorism measures for the EU and in France.’

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The Guardian, 9th January 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Terror law reform signals fundamental shift – BBC News

Posted December 15th, 2014 in bills, confiscation, freedom of movement, news, passports, police, terrorism by tracey

‘Monday sees the return of the government’s Counter Terrorism and Security Bill to the Commons where MPs will get their say on the legislation’s most controversial measure: should ministers be able to ban British citizens from coming home?’

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BBC News, 15th December 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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‘Right to rent’ checks start in West Midlands – BBC News

Posted December 1st, 2014 in fines, immigration, landlord & tenant, news, passports by tracey

‘Landlords in the West Midlands who fail to check whether prospective tenants are in the country legally will face a £3,000 fine, under a new rule expected to be rolled out across the UK.’

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BBC News, 1st December 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Counter Terrorism and Security Bill unveiled – Home Office

Posted November 27th, 2014 in bills, citizenship, news, passports, terrorism, visas by sally

‘Urgently-needed legislation which will give the UK some of the toughest powers in the world to tackle the increasing threat from international terrorism was introduced today.’

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Home Office, 26th November 2014

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

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Theresa May to publish new anti-terror powers – BBC News

‘New measures to tackle terrorism are to be unveiled by the home secretary, days after she said the UK faces a “greater” terror threat than ever before.’

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BBC News, 26th November 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Counter-Terrorism Bill – the proposals in a nutshell – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘Whatever else can be said about the war on terrorism, it has been hugely influential in the shaping of the law (statutory, common law and European). The latest proposal to come from the Coalition is a “Temporary Exclusion Order”, announced in the press in September. It was “re-booted” in November and we are told that these will feature in the new Counter-Terrorism and Security Bill (name not confirmed) due before Christmas. The Bill is in fact scheduled to be published later this week, but these things sometimes slip.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 25th November 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Jihadis who travel to Syria could be barred from UK return for two years – The Guardian

‘Suspected jihadis, including teenagers, who travel to Syria will be prevented from returning to Britain for two years and only allowed to re-enter if they consent to face trial, home detention, regular police monitoring or go on a deradicalisation course. The plan, agreed after months of internal Whitehall talks, has been cleared by government law officers and devised to minimise legal claims that the British government will be rendering citizens stateless by barring them from the UK.’

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The Guardian, 14th November 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Passport confiscation plan to stop ‘FGM’ – Daily Telegraph

Posted October 21st, 2014 in anonymity, bills, female genital mutilation, news, passports by sally

‘Government sets out new measures to combat female genital mutilation, including confiscating travel documents of girls who may be at risk.’

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Daily Telegraph, 20th October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Her Majesty’s Passport Office made directly accountable to Ministers – Home Office

Posted September 26th, 2014 in government departments, immigration, passports, press releases by tracey

‘Her Majesty’s Passport Office (HMPO) is to be brought into the Home Office and made directly accountable to Ministers, Home Secretary Theresa May has announced today.’

Full press release

Home Office, 26th September 2014

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

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Advertising watchdog bans three ‘copycats’ of government websites – The Guardian

Posted September 17th, 2014 in advertising, birth certificates, documents, internet, news, passports, visas by tracey

‘The advertising watchdog has banned three “copycat” websites masquerading as government channels for health insurance cards, passports and birth certificates, leaving consumers thousands of pounds out of pocket.’

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The Guardian, 17th September 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Victims’ Rights, the EU Charter, and Passport Confiscation – the Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In recent news, the government outlines proposals for increased rights for the victims of crime, as well as for the revocation and confiscation of passports for ISIS fighters returning to the UK. In other news, the legality of the EU Charter comes back to haunt Chris Grayling once again.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 15th September 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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SRA investigating nine criminal law firms over failures in advice to asylum seekers – Legal Futures

‘The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) is investigating nine criminal law firms over failures in advice to asylum seekers, it has emerged.’

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Legal Futures, 26th August 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Extremist jailed for possessing terrorist material and evading justice – The Guardian

Posted August 12th, 2014 in bail, news, passports, sentencing, terrorism by sally

‘An extremist convicted of trying to flee the country after he was caught with terrorist material on his computer has been jailed for a total of two years and seven months.’

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The Guardian, 12th August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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‘Skywalker’ signature rejected by passport officials – BBC News

Posted July 30th, 2014 in film industry, names, news, passports, trade marks by sally

‘A woman who added “Skywalker” as a middle name has been told by passport officials her signature infringes a trademark.’

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BBC News, 30th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Copycat government websites targeted in crackdown on hoaxers – The Independent

Posted July 7th, 2014 in complaints, consumer protection, fees, fraud, internet, news, passports by sally

‘A crackdown on hoaxers who trick people out of money via copycat government websites has been launched as the Coalition takes action following thousands of complaints over the practice.’

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The Independent, 7th July 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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In re B (A Child) (Wrongful Removal: Order to Secure Return of Child) – WLR Daily

In re B (A Child) (Wrongful Removal: Order to Secure Return of Child): [2014] EWCA Civ 843; [2014] WLR (D) 283

‘Although there was no doubt that there were circumstances in which the High Court, in exercise of its inherent jurisdiction, could properly make an order requiring someone to lodge their passport with the court or with some suitable custodian it was not permissible to make such an order to compel a third party without parental responsibility, or any other form of power or control over the child, to take steps to secure the return of an abducted child. Furthermore, where the subject of the order was not yet 17 it was simply wrong as a matter of principle to attach a penal notice to the order since a child could not be imprisoned or detained for contempt.’

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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