Man given suspended sentence for death threat to MP – The Guardian

‘A man who sent a threatening voice message to senior Labour MP Ben Bradshaw the day before the killing of parliamentary colleague Jo Cox has been given a suspended sentence.’

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The Guardian, 23rd August 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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MPs urge action on “significant” legal loophole in taxi licensing – Local Government Lawyer

Posted August 22nd, 2016 in codes of practice, licensing, local government, news, parliament, taxis by sally

‘MPs have called on the Government to address a “damaging and significant legal loophole” that allows taxis licensed by other local authorities to operate within Rotherham, even if the drivers have had their application for a Rotherham licence rejected.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 19th August 2016

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

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Brexit legal challenge: High Court bid could derail Theresa May’s EU exit timetable – The Independent

Posted August 22nd, 2016 in costs, EC law, fees, news, parliament, referendums by sally

‘Remain supporters have crowd-funded £32,000 in legal fees to argue Ms May will need Parliament’s backing before beginning formal negotiations to leave the EU.’

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The Independent, 20th August 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Rights group challenges FoI refusal in Libyan rendition case – The Guardian

‘A human rights group has challenged the government’s refusal to disclose whether ministers or Downing Street officials were involved in a decision not to prosecute anyone over an espionage operation to kidnap two Libyan dissidents.’

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The Guardian, 21st August 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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The need for Parliament’s consent to trigger Art 50 is a matter of EU Law – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted August 17th, 2016 in consent, EC law, news, parliament, referendums, treaties by sally

‘Paragraph 1 of Art 50 of the Treaty on European Union, governing voluntary withdrawal of a member state from the EU, reads: “Any member state may decide to withdraw from the Union in accordance with its own constitutional requirements.” This right is followed in the next paragraph by an obligation: “A member state which decides to withdraw shall notify the European Council of its intention.” This contribution addresses a single hypothetical scenario, namely, one in which Theresa May triggers Art 50 without prior parliamentary approval, asking: If she did this, would she be acting illegally? Several legal commentators have now offered answers to this question, the majority in the affirmative, and last month a legal action began by which the claimants wish to enjoin May from so acting. Thus the judges will have the final say. But which judges?’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 16th August 2016

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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David Cameron to face inquiry into resignation honours list – The Independent

‘David Cameron is to face a Commons inquiry into his resignation honours list, which has been widely criticised for the way he used it to reward friends and financial backers.’

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The Independent, 9th August 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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UK government tests whether ‘online activity history’ can serve to verify identity – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 27th, 2016 in data protection, internet, news, parliament, privacy, statistics by sally

‘The UK government has tested whether internet users’ “online activity history”, including data from social networks, can be used to verify their identity when they use online public services.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 26th July 2016

Source: www.out-law.com

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Survivors must have a stronger voice in Goddard abuse inquiry – The Guardian

Posted July 27th, 2016 in child abuse, evidence, inquiries, news, parliament, sexual offences, victims by sally

‘Justice Lowell Goddard will be unable to deliver justice or tackle child sex abuse if her inquiry sidelines survivors.’

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The Guardian, 26th July 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Five things you may have missed about the Chilcot inquiry – The Guardian

‘Much of the furore surrounding the Iraq war report focused on the failings of Tony Blair. But there were other, crucial findings that shouldn’t be ignored.’

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The Guardian, 26th July 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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High court challenge could derail Labour leadership race – The Guardian

Posted July 27th, 2016 in elections, news, parliament, political parties, statistics by sally

‘Labour could be forced to reopen its nomination process for the leadership contest if a high court judge rules on Thursday that Jeremy Corbyn must have the support of his MPs to appear on the ballot.’

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The Guardian, 26th July 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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FCA branded ‘inadequate’ as MPs call for new bank watchdog – The Independent

Posted July 26th, 2016 in banking, financial regulation, news, parliament, select committees by sally

‘Britain needs a new financial watchdog to punish wrongdoing in order to win public confidence, further reshaping a regulatory structure that was overhauled just three years ago, the Treasury Select Committee has said.’

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The Independent, 26th July 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Attorney General Speech at the Royal Courts of Justice – Attorney General’s Office

Posted July 25th, 2016 in attorney general, legal history, lord chancellor, news, parliament, speeches by sally

‘Attorney General Jeremy Wright QC MP’s speech at the Lord Chancellor’s swearing in ceremony.’

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Attorney General’s Office, 21st July 2016

Source: www.gov.uk/ago

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MPs reject bill to change Britain’s voting system to proportional representation – The Independent

Posted July 21st, 2016 in bills, constitutional reform, elections, news, parliament by tracey

‘MPs have rejected a bill that would have changed Britain’s voting system to a form of proportional representation.’

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The Independent, 20th July 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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MPs to debate motion declaring Tony Blair in ‘contempt’ of parliament in September – The Independent

Posted July 21st, 2016 in deceit, Iraq, news, parliament, reports, war by tracey

‘MPs are to debate a motion on whether to declare Tony Blair in “contempt” of Parliament because of his role in the Iraq War.’

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The Independent, 20th July 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Hanningfield acquitted of expenses fraud after parliament intervenes with court – The Guardian

‘Former Tory peer accused of submitting false expenses has been formally acquitted after parliament made an unexpected intervention in the case. Lord Hanningfield, who served a jail sentence for expenses fraud in 2011, was accused in Southwark crown court of claiming around £3,300 in House of Lords allowances in July 2013 to which he was not entitled.’

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The Guardian, 18th July 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Stephen Laws: Article 50 and the political constitution – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted July 18th, 2016 in bills, constitutional law, news, parliament, referendums, treaties by sally

‘The only relevant question now left for the UK about the Art 50 notification is what needs to be done before it is given. It is politically inevitable that the referendum result will be accepted and the notification given, perhaps in January next year.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 18th July 2016

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Yossi Nehushtan: Why Is It Illegal for the Prime Minister to Perceive the EU Referendum’s Result as Morally-Politically Authoritative? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘On the legal front, the current debate focuses on the question of who has the legal authority to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty and begin the Brexit process. Some argue (quite convincingly) that only Parliament has this authority (and see Barber, Hickman, and King’s post). Others argue that Government, and in fact the Prime Minister, acting under the Royal Prerogative, can act without the approval of Parliament. The latter is, apparently, the view of Government’s lawyers.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, July 2016

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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‘Should Vote Leave be prosecuted over its referendum propaganda?’ – Church Court Chambers

‘On 23 June 2016 over 33 million people voted in the EU referendum. Since that date there has been widespread anger from those who believe that the organisation ‘Vote Leave’ misled members of the public. Vote Leave is said to have done so by promoting two claims. First, that the UK sends £350 million to the European Union every week and this money would be spent on the National Health Service if the UK voted to leave the European Union. Second, that remaining in the European Union would lead to unrestricted immigration.’

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Church Court Chambers, 7th July 2016

Source: www.churchcourtchambers.co.uk

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Robert Craig: Triggering Article 50 Does not Require Fresh Legislation – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘Considerable public interest has recently been focused on the ‘trigger’ mechanism for exit from the EU which is set out in Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Expert opinion has divided between those who believe that the power to trigger Article 50 rests with the Executive using the legal authority of the royal prerogative from the Crown with no further parliamentary involvement necessary and those who argue that fresh legislation is required to confer statutory authorisation on the Executive to do something which could render nugatory rights under the European Communities Act 1972 (‘ECA’). An ingenious third way involving section 2(2) of the ECA has also been suggested.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 8th July 2016

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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First legal attempt to prevent Brexit set for preliminary hearing – The Guardian

‘The first legal attempt to prevent the prime minister initiating Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union is to be heard later this month.’

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The Guardian, 8th July 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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