South Yorkshire PCC Alan Billings to investigate Hillsborough police ‘spin’ – BBC News

‘South Yorkshire’s re-elected police and crime commissioner will investigate claims that a former police press officer was asked to “spin” news during the Hillsborough inquests.’

Full story

BBC News, 7th May 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off on South Yorkshire PCC Alan Billings to investigate Hillsborough police ‘spin’ – BBC News

Hillsborough inquest timeline: the long wait for justice – The Guardian

‘The families of the 96 people fatally injured at the 1989 FA Cup semi-final have been fighting for the truth for 27 years.’

Full story

The Guardian, 26th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Hillsborough inquest timeline: the long wait for justice – The Guardian

Court of Protection orders continued reporting restrictions after death – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Court of Protection has just ruled that where a court has restricted the publication of information during proceedings that were in existence during a person’s lifetime, it has not only the right but the duty to consider, when requested to do so, whether that information should continue to be protected following the person’s death.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 27th April 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Comments Off on Court of Protection orders continued reporting restrictions after death – UK Human Rights Blog

Misuse of your private information – Can You Put A Value On That? – 4 KBW

Posted April 26th, 2016 in appeals, damages, human rights, interception, media, news, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘The Supreme Court has refused MGN Limited permission to appeal the decision in Representative Claimants -v- Mirror Group Newspapers Ltd [2015] EWCA Civ 1291 – the Court of Appeal’s decision regarding the appropriate level of damages in eight phone-hacking ‘test cases’. This decision itself was an unsuccessful appeal by MGN against the High Court decision in Gulatti & Ors v MGN Limited [2015] EWHC 1482.’

Full story

4 KBW, 8th April 2016

Source: www.4kbw.net

Comments Off on Misuse of your private information – Can You Put A Value On That? – 4 KBW

Woman who died after ‘losing sparkle’ cannot be named, court rules – The Guardian

‘The court of protection has declined to name a 50-year-old woman who died after refusing life-saving kidney treatment because she said life had lost its “sparkle”.’

Full story

The Guardian, 25th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Woman who died after ‘losing sparkle’ cannot be named, court rules – The Guardian

Doing time: confessions of a crime reporter – The Guardian

Posted April 25th, 2016 in criminal justice, media, news by sally

‘Duncan Campbell has reported on the most infamous cases of the past 50 years, from the Rosemary West trial to the Hatton Garden heist. The veteran journalist recalls a life in crime.’

Full story

The Guardian, 23rd April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Doing time: confessions of a crime reporter – The Guardian

Why do UK media fail to cover the deaths of black people in custody? – The Guardian

Posted April 20th, 2016 in death in custody, media, minorities, news by sally

‘A journalist argues that, unlike in the US, such deaths do not generate a national conversation because mainstream media platforms marginalise diverse voices.’

Full story

The Guardian, 19th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Why do UK media fail to cover the deaths of black people in custody? – The Guardian

Celebrity injunction should be lifted, Court of Appeal rules – BBC News

Posted April 19th, 2016 in appeals, human rights, injunctions, media, news, privacy by sally

‘An injunction banning the media in England and Wales from reporting the identity of a married celebrity who allegedly took part in a threesome has been lifted.’

Full story

BBC News, 18th April 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off on Celebrity injunction should be lifted, Court of Appeal rules – BBC News

Can privacy survive publicity? – Judgment in PJS – Panopticon

Posted April 19th, 2016 in human rights, injunctions, internet, media, news, privacy by sally

‘It has long been clear that, so far as the common law is concerned, there is no neat dividing line between information which is private and that which is public. Thus, depending on the circumstances, information relating to an individual’s private life which has entered the public domain may yet engage privacy rights (see further e.g. McKennitt v Ash [2005] EWHC 303 (QB) and Green Corns v Claverley [2005] 958 (QB) and Rocknroll v News Group [2013] EWHC 24 (Ch)). However, what is the position where, notwithstanding that an injunction restrains the publication of the information domestically, the information is being extensively published and shared online elsewhere around the world?’

Full story

Panopticon, 18th April 2016

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

Comments Off on Can privacy survive publicity? – Judgment in PJS – Panopticon

Celebrity injunction: blogger defies legal threats as more papers print details – The Guardian

Posted April 13th, 2016 in appeals, contempt of court, injunctions, media, news, privacy by sally

‘Attempts to silence a blogger who published the identities of a celebrity couple at the centre of a UK press injunction appear to have backfired, as newspapers in Canada and Sweden published details of the story.’

Full story

The Guardian, 13th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Celebrity injunction: blogger defies legal threats as more papers print details – The Guardian

Vicarious liability for rogue employee’s data leak – Panopticon

‘Suppose confidential, private and sensitive information is sold, leaked or otherwise wrongly disclosed by a rogue employee: is the employer vicariously liable? This question is a troubling one for many an employer and data controller. A new judgment on a claim for misuse of private information sheds some light on this question – and will not be comforting for employers and data controllers. The case is Axon v Ministry of Defence [2016] EWHC 787 (QB).’

Full story

Panopticon, 12th April 2016

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

Comments Off on Vicarious liability for rogue employee’s data leak – Panopticon

Chills, thrills and surprises: ten years of freedom of information in the UK – OUP Blog

Posted April 12th, 2016 in freedom of information, legislation, media, news, parliament by sally

‘The Freedom of Information (FOI) Act has been in the news again, when the controversial Independent Commission, much to the surprise of many, concluded the Act was ‘generally working well’, had ‘enhanced openness and transparency… there is no evidence that the Act needs to be radically altered’.’

Full story

OUP Blog, 10th April 2016

Source: http://blog.oup.com

Comments Off on Chills, thrills and surprises: ten years of freedom of information in the UK – OUP Blog

This celebrity injunction will probably rebound – a case of the ‘Streisand effect’ – The Guardian

Posted April 12th, 2016 in freedom of expression, injunctions, internet, media, news, privacy, publishing by sally

‘As a Scottish newspaper publishes details of a sex scandal, when does a legal fight to ensure privacy become a pointless exercise to restrict free speech?’

Full story

The Guardian, 11th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on This celebrity injunction will probably rebound – a case of the ‘Streisand effect’ – The Guardian

A judge’s sentence is not for entertainment – Daily Telegraph

Posted April 8th, 2016 in judiciary, media, news, public interest, reporting restrictions, sentencing by sally

‘Being appointed a judge is like going to school, one of our distinguished judges noted when he was first appointed. You have to sit in one place every day, all day. You have to listen to people addressing you, to take notes, and hand in your homework at the end.’

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 7th April 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Comments Off on A judge’s sentence is not for entertainment – Daily Telegraph

Victims of press intrusion deserve better than a return to the status quo – The Guardian

Posted April 7th, 2016 in defamation, freedom of expression, inquiries, media, news, privacy, victims by sally

‘I was one of the victims of unscrupulous newspapers that David Cameron pledged to protect in the of wake of the Leveson report. Let’s ensure he keeps his promises.’

Full story

The Guardian, 6th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Victims of press intrusion deserve better than a return to the status quo – The Guardian

Injunction ruling enables celebrities to hide sex lives, says top lawyer – The Guardian

Posted April 7th, 2016 in children, injunctions, media, news, privacy by sally

‘A leading media lawyer has claimed that celebrities have been given carte blanche to use their children to prevent stories about their sex lives being published, after a court upheld an injunction against the Sun on Sunday.’

Full story

The Guardian, 6th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Injunction ruling enables celebrities to hide sex lives, says top lawyer – The Guardian

Angela Wrightson murder: How the media fought to report the case – BBC News

Posted April 7th, 2016 in internet, media, murder, news, reporting restrictions, retrials, trials by sally

‘The jury in the trial of two girls convicted of murdering a vulnerable woman heard graphic evidence of how they tortured and beat her to death. But the crime sparked such abusive comments on Facebook that a judge feared the girls could not have a fair hearing. He scrapped the case and ordered a retrial for the following year – leading to a seven-month fight by the media to be allowed to report on it. This is what happened.’

Full story

BBC News, 7th April 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off on Angela Wrightson murder: How the media fought to report the case – BBC News

Press victims ‘betrayed’ by law delay – BBC News

Posted April 6th, 2016 in defamation, delay, inquiries, media, news, privacy by tracey

‘Victims of press intrusion have accused the government of breaking its promise over regulation. The group, which includes Kate and Gerry McCann, says a delay in bringing into law a key part of the Royal Charter agreement is a “betrayal”.’

Full story

BBC News, 6th April 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off on Press victims ‘betrayed’ by law delay – BBC News

Clips-sharing website loses copyright fixture – Technology Law Update

Posted April 5th, 2016 in copyright, internet, media, news, sport by sally

‘A website and apps set up to enable the sharing of 8-second clips of broadcast cricket matches on a near-live basis has been found to infringe copyright.’

Full story

Technology Law Update, 4th April 2016

Source: www.technology-law-blog.co.uk

Comments Off on Clips-sharing website loses copyright fixture – Technology Law Update

Teaching human rights in schools: ‘Who am I to say that democracy is the right way? – OUP Blog

Posted April 4th, 2016 in bias, education, human rights, media, news, school children, teachers by sally

‘“What could very easily happen with teaching about human rights is indoctrination…so let’s say someone says that racism isn’t wrong. Okay, so what would happen is that ‘racism is wrong. You have to learn it’. That’s the way it would be taught… Actually, I think a debate around that is needed, because I don’t think you can say that intrinsically racism is wrong. You can say that as a society, we’ve formed a set of values that have concluded that racism is wrong.”

When a primary school teacher says something like this to you as a researcher, it makes you sit up and take notice. Whilst it would be comforting to think that this is simply the isolated perspective of one wayward teacher, my research into teachers’ perceptions of educating primary school children about human rights was punctuated by similarly troubling viewpoints. One teacher found it difficult to talk about the atrocities that happened at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp without telling the children in her classroom that “this is the most heinous crime ever imagined”, following this up with “and you can’t do that, so it’s very difficult.” Another was loathe to teach that democracy was “the right way,” because she didn’t want to influence, but rather to simply “open children’s eyes.” Her final comment on this issue being “who am I to say that democracy is the right way?”’

Full story

OUP Blog, 4th April 2016

Source: http://blog.oup.com

Comments Off on Teaching human rights in schools: ‘Who am I to say that democracy is the right way? – OUP Blog