Operation Elveden: Ex-prison officer jailed for celebrity tips – BBC News

‘A former prison officer has been jailed for 10 months for selling “salacious gossip” about celebrity inmates to two national newspapers.’

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BBC News, 15th May 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Business claiming ‘passing off’ must have UK customers before it can sue in UK, says Supreme Court – OUT-LAw.com

Posted May 15th, 2015 in foreign jurisdictions, media, news, Supreme Court, trade marks, trade names by tracey

‘The Hong Kong-based provider of internet TV subscription service NOW TV could not prevent Sky using the same name for a similar service in the UK because it did not have a UK customer base, the UK’s highest court has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 14th May 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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Using photographs from social media—rights of privacy – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted May 13th, 2015 in complaints, consent, internet, media, news, photography, privacy by tracey

‘The Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) recently upheld a complaint against a newspaper after it published an image taken from social media without consent.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 13th May 2015

Source: wwww.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Reporting Restrictions in the Criminal Courts – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

‘A fourth updated set of guidelines on open justice and reporting restrictions in the criminal courts is published today by the Judicial College, News Media Association (NMA), Society of Editors and the Media Lawyers Association. The new edition covers the new reporting restrictions applying to under 18 year olds, which came into force last month, the Female Genital Mutilation anonymity provisions which came into force this month and other changes relevant to reporting the work of the criminal courts.’

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Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 6th May 2015

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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New guidance developed to help local authorities communicate via social media – OUT-LAW.com

Posted May 7th, 2015 in internet, local government, media, news by sally

‘A new information platform has been set up to help local authorities improve the way they communicate on social media.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 6th May 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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Miu Miu ad banned for appearing to sexualise a child – The Guardian

Posted May 6th, 2015 in advertising, children, media, news by sally

‘An ad campaign for fashion brand Miu Miu that ran in Vogue magazine has been banned for appearing to sexualise a child.’

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The Guardian, 6th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Aitken v Director of Public Prosecutions – WLR Daily

Posted April 30th, 2015 in law reports, media, publishing, reporting restrictions by sally

Aitken v Director of Public Prosecutions [2015] EWHC 1079 (Admin); [2015] WLR (D) 184

‘The editor of a newspaper did not as a matter of law fall outside the scope of the expression “any person who publishes” for the purposes of the offence of publishing information likely to lead to the identification of a child witness/victim in criminal proceedings, contrary to section 39(2) of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933.’

WLR Daily, 23rd April 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Procedure – 39 Essex Chambers

Posted April 29th, 2015 in anonymity, costs, damages, dismissal, legislation, media, news, personal injuries by sally

‘Section 57 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015 comes into force on 13 April 2015.

Section 57, which introduces the presumption of dismissal in personal injury claims where the claimant has been found to be fundamentally dishonest in relation to a primary or related claim, comes into force on 13 April 20151. The explanatory notes to the Bill for this Act confirm that this provision is designed to extend the power identified in Summers v Fairclough Homes Ltd2 beyond the very exceptional circumstances required there under for an abusive claim to be struck out at the end of trial. The reference to a ‘related claim’ makes it clear that the Shah v Ul-Haq3 style claimant, who dishonestly supports the fraudulent claim of another, will also stand to lose their own (honest) claim.’

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39 Essex Chambers, April 2015

Source: www.39essex.com

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Operation Elveden: 13th Century Justice – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘Operation Elveden was prompted by the Leveson Inquiry – evidence heard at the Inquiry suggested there was a culture of tabloid newspapers paying public officials for stories. At a time when the tabloid press was being vilified for intruding in people’s private lives through phone hacking, this was seen as further evidence of out-of- control journalists, ignoring the law for their own gain.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 24th April 2015

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Operation Elveden: Journalists cleared in payment trial – BBC News

‘Three journalists have been found not guilty of illegally paying public officials by a jury at the Old Bailey.’

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BBC News, 17th April 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Journalists should not always be prosecuted for paying public officials, says former CPS head – The Indpendent

‘The former head of the Crown Prosecution Service has said it can be “appropriate” for journalists to pay officials for information and that Operation Elveden had overlooked the public interest.’

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The Independent, 18th April 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Crown Prosecution Service re-review of Operation Elveden – CPS News Brief

‘Operation Elveden is a Metropolitan Police Service investigation that revealed the payments made to corrupt public officials by journalists for information. It followed two parliamentary committees and the Leveson Inquiry which revealed serious questions over the techniques used by some which may have amounted to systematic and flagrant breaches of the law. The range and circumstance of this activity was of a scale not previously encountered by police or CPS.’

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CPS News Brief, 17th April 2015

Source: http://blog.cps.gov.uk

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Three years, £20 million, one conviction: Operation Elveden on brink of collapse – Daily Telegraph

‘Operation Elveden, the long running investigation into allegations of corruption by tabloid journalists, lies in tatters after the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) was forced to scrap most of the outstanding cases. ‘

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Daily Telegraph, 17th April 2015

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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TV ‘exposure’ of Scientology halted by UK libel law split – The Guardian

‘Plans to broadcast HBO’s Church of Scientology exposé, Going Clear, have been shelved by Sky Atlantic in a virtual repeat of events two years ago, when UK publishers abandoned publication of the book on which the hard-hitting new TV documentary is based.’

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The Guardian, 18th April 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Law firms exploiting EU ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling to help individuals remove awkward newspaper articles from Google – The Independent

Posted April 20th, 2015 in EC law, freedom of information, internet, law firms, media, news, public interest by sally

‘Ambulance-chasing law firms are using the European Court’s ruling on the “right to be forgotten” to drum up business, leading to a rise in the number of newspaper articles being deleted from Google search results.’

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The Independent, 17th April 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Operation Elveden: Judge to allow majority verdicts – BBC News

Posted April 17th, 2015 in juries, jury directions, media, misfeasance in public office, news, verdicts by sally

‘The jury in the latest trial of journalists accused of illegally paying public officials has been told the judge will accept majority verdicts.’

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BBC News, 16th April 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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CPS seeks retrial for prison officer after conviction quashed – The Guardian

‘A prison officer whose conviction over leaks to newspapers was quashed by the court of appeal is facing a retrial, it has been confirmed.’

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The Guardian, 1st April 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Erol Incedal trial evidence must remain secret, judge rules – The Guardian

Posted April 2nd, 2015 in evidence, media, news, private hearings, reporting restrictions, terrorism by sally

‘The bulk of the evidence in the UK’s first terror trial held mostly behind closed doors will remain secret forever, a judge has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 1st April 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Untangling the spider’s web: Evans at the Supreme Court – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘On Friday, 27th March, the Supreme Court handed down a decision which will be as much of interest to public lawyers as information rights practitioners alike. Evans, a journalist for the Guardian newspaper utilised the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004 to seek the disclosure of letters sent by Prince Charles to seven government departments between September 2004 and March 2005. The departments refused to disclose the letters (so-called “black spider” memos on account of the Prince’s handwriting) on the basis that they were exempt from doing so. In their view the letters represented private correspondence which effectively allowed the Prince to prepare for “kingship.” Evans subsequently complained to the Information Commissioner who upheld the refusal before appealing to the Information Tribunal. The Tribunal held that many of the letters should be disclosed as they constituted “advocacy correspondence.”’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 31st March 2015

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Trials of journalists alleged to have paid money to public officials for private documents halted as CPS holds urgent review of its decision to prosecute – The Independent

‘The first of the eight trials involving journalists alleged to have paid money to public officials for private documents and due to take place between now and September, has been adjourned at the Old Bailey.’

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The Independent, 31st March 2015

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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