Leveson inquiry: The spy, the judge and the ‘cover-up’ – The Independent

Posted March 3rd, 2014 in complaints, corruption, inquiries, interception, judges, media, news, ombudsmen, police, privacy by sally

‘Sir Brian Leveson “pulled his punches” over evidence of “serious police corruption at the very highest level” because it was “too hot to handle”, according to a complaint that has been lodged with the judicial watchdog by a News of the World hacking victim.’

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The Independent, 2nd March 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Jacob Rowbottom: Laws, Miranda and the Democratic Justification for Expression – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted February 24th, 2014 in airports, detention, freedom of expression, human rights, media, news, proportionality by sally

‘The Divisional Court’s decision in the David Miranda case has provoked much controversy and debate about freedom of the press and national security issues. About halfway through his judgment, Laws LJ makes a number of comments about the justifications for freedom of expression and media freedom. While these may not be the most pressing or immediately important issues raised by this particular case, it is worth noting what Laws LJ says at paras [41-46] as he seems to move away from what has been something of an orthodoxy in the British and European jurisprudence – the importance placed on the democratic justification for expression.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 22nd February 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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British Telecommunications plc v Office of Communications and others – WLR Daily

Posted February 21st, 2014 in compensation, jurisdiction, law reports, licensing, media by sally

British Telecommunications plc v Office of Communications and others [2014] EWCA Civ 133; [2014] WLR (D) 79

‘The Office of Communications had jurisdiction under section 316 of the Communications Act 2003 to impose conditions in broadcasting licences where the practices of licenceholders made it appropriate to impose such conditions to ensure fair and effective competition.’

WLR Daily, 17th February 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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David Miranda challenge dismissed in High Court – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The High Court has rejected all the arguments supporting David Miranda’s application for judicial review of his detention at Heathrow Airport in August last year. In a highly readable and pungent judgment, Laws LJ has some robust things to say about the vaunting of journalistic interests over public security in the guise of Article 10, and the “mission creep” of requirements demanded by the courts for state action to be considered “proportionate”.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 19th February 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Ofcom order requiring BSkyB to sell wholesale access to sports channels reinstated by Court of Appeal – OUT-LAW.com

Posted February 19th, 2014 in appeals, competition, media, news, ombudsmen, sport by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has reinstated an order made by telecoms regulator Ofcom which required pay-TV operator BSkyB (Sky) to sell wholesale access to its sports channels to rival providers at a set price.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 18th February 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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‘Offensive’ nude scanner app ad shown during soap banned – BBC News

Posted February 19th, 2014 in advertising, children, complaints, media, news, ombudsmen, women by sally

‘A TV advert for a “nude scanner” mobile phone app has been banned after it was shown during a prime-time show.’

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BBC News, 19th February 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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EastEnders cleared over ‘racist’ complaints – BBC News

Posted February 3rd, 2014 in complaints, media, news, ombudsmen, racism by tracey

‘EastEnders has been cleared by the broadcasting watchdog over complaints about a Muslim character berating her father for dating a “white woman”.’

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BBC News, 3rd February 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Secret hearings could allow police to seize journalists’ notes if bill passes – The Guardian

Posted February 3rd, 2014 in bills, closed material, disclosure, inquiries, media, news, police by tracey

‘The seizure of journalists’ notebooks, photographs and digital files could be conducted in secret hearings, owing to a little-publicised clause in a government bill aimed at cutting red tape, media organisations have warned. Requests for notebooks, computer disks, photographs or videos must currently be made in open court and representatives of news groups can be present. But the clause – in the deregulation bill, which comes before the Commons on Monday – significantly alters the way courts consider so-called “production orders”, stripping out current safeguards.’

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The Guardian, 31st January 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Premier League live football: Pub landlord broke copyright law – BBC News

Posted January 31st, 2014 in copyright, costs, licensed premises, media, news, sport by sally

‘A pub landlord has to pay £65,000 in legal costs for breaching the Premier League’s copyright by showing football matches using a foreign satellite card authorised only for private use.’

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BBC News, 30th January 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Afghan refugee wins ‘Taliban’ libel case – BBC News

Posted January 30th, 2014 in damages, defamation, media, news, refugees by sally

‘An Afghan refugee granted asylum in the UK has accepted substantial libel damages over a newspaper accused him of being a member of the Taliban.’

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BBC News, 29th January 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Media can refuse subject access requests if complying could jeopardise stories, says ICO – OUT-LAW.com

‘Newspapers and other media groups can refuse individuals’ requests for access to the personal data those organisations hold about them where the disclosure of that information could jeopardise future stories, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has said.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 27th January 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Pulling back the curtain of privacy in family and Court of Protection proceedings – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘New guidance on transparency in proceedings has been published by the President of the Family Division and of the Court of Protection, Sir James Munby.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 23rd January 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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In Conversation with Joshua Rozenberg – LSE

Posted January 23rd, 2014 in media, news, solicitors by sally

‘Joshua Rozenberg is Britain’s best-known commentator on the law. In 2012 he was included by The Times in its independently-judged list of the UK’s 100 most influential lawyers, the only journalist to feature in the Times Law 100.’

Video (YouTube)

LSE, 16th January 2014

Source: www.lse.ac.uk/collections/law/events

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Former Broadmoor worker Alan Ostler admits misconduct – BBC News

‘A former worker at the high-security Broadmoor hospital has been given a suspended prison sentence after passing information to tabloid newspapers.’

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BBC News, 20th January 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Family judge ‘cannot control foreign media’ – BBC News

Posted January 15th, 2014 in anonymity, children, disclosure, family courts, foreign jurisdictions, judges, media, news by tracey

‘A senior family judge says he cannot stop the foreign media from publishing the story of a Slovakian mother whose son has been placed into care.’

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BBC News, 14th January 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Police chief issues partial apology over Lawrence whistleblower documents – The Guardian

‘A police chief has issued a partial apology over his attempt to force Channel 4 to hand over documents about a whistleblower who revealed how undercover officers infiltrated the campaign to bring the killers of Stephen Lawrence to justice.’

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The Guardian, 14th January 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Police demand details about Stephen Lawrence whistleblower – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 14th, 2014 in crime, media, news, official secrets act, police, whistleblowers by tracey

‘Police have asked for information about Peter Francis, the whistleblower who revealed a raft of claims about a police undercover unit, including that they had spied on relatives of Stephen Lawrence.’

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Daily Telegraph, 14th January 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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The old debate: punish prisoners, or rehabilitate them? – Daily Telegraph

Posted December 19th, 2013 in imprisonment, media, news, prisons, rehabilitation by tracey

‘Debates over how to treat prisoners have gone on since imprisonment began: should the prison system leave inmates to fester in cold cells, with punishment and deterrence as the goal of incarceration? Or should it let them wander from classroom to games room, preaching rehabilitation into society as its main aim?’

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Daily Telegraph, 18th December 2013

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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One Direction’s Harry Styles wins court order against paparazzi – The Guardian

Posted December 16th, 2013 in injunctions, media, news, photography, privacy by sally

‘One Direction’s Harry Styles has won a court order banning the paparazzi from pursuing him in the street or waiting outside his house.’

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The Guardian, 16th December 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Misleading once? The Times lawyer, Leveson and a signal sent – Legal Week

‘I don’t really know what to think about the outcome of the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) hearing into the case of Alistair Brett, the former legal manager of The Times. Here was a man plainly admired by many in the media law world. Many watched with spine-tingling horror as his reputation disintegrated under cross-examination at the Leveson inquiry (you can still watch it online). But for that, he may well have escaped prosecution, let alone censure. It is a rare day that sees someone’s litigation tactics scrutinised under cross-examination by a QC and a Court of Appeal judge.’

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Legal Week, 10th December 2013

Source: www.legalweek.com

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