GQ publisher fined for contempt of court over Rebekah Brooks article – The Guardian

Posted February 5th, 2016 in contempt of court, fines, interception, media, news by tracey

‘The publisher of GQ magazine has been fined £10,000 after being found in contempt of court over an article that seriously risked prejudicing the phone-hacking trial of Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson.’

Full story

The Guardian, 4th February 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on GQ publisher fined for contempt of court over Rebekah Brooks article – The Guardian

An open or shut case? – UK Human Rights Blog

‘R(C) v. Secretary of State for Justice [2016] UKSC 2. When is it right to keep the names of parties to litigation a secret? That was the difficult question the Supreme Court had to grapple with in this judgment, handed down on Wednesday. The decision to allow a double-murderer to remain anonymous led to outraged headlines in the tabloids. Yet the Court reached the unanimous conclusion that this was the right approach. Why?.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 29th January 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Comments Off on An open or shut case? – UK Human Rights Blog

Court of Protection prepares to open up – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

‘A pilot scheme begins today which will see the public and media gain access to Court of Protection hearings across England and Wales for the first time.’

Full press release

Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 29th January 2016

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

Comments Off on Court of Protection prepares to open up – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

Jimmy Carr’s ‘offensive’ dwarf joke broke broadcasting rules, says watchdog – The Guardian

Posted January 26th, 2016 in BBC, codes of practice, complaints, media, news by sally

‘Jimmy Carr’s joke about dwarves on BBC1’s The One Show was offensive and broke broadcasting rules, the media watchdog has said.’

Full story

The Guardian, 25th January 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Jimmy Carr’s ‘offensive’ dwarf joke broke broadcasting rules, says watchdog – The Guardian

Gordon-Saker: Newspaper’s rights not breached by success fees and ATE recovery – Litigation Futures

‘A newspaper’s right to free expression under article 10 of the European Convention was not breached by being ordered to pay success fees and after-the-event (ATE) insurance premiums, Master Gordon-Saker has ruled.’

Full story

Litigation Futures, 19th January 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Comments Off on Gordon-Saker: Newspaper’s rights not breached by success fees and ATE recovery – Litigation Futures

Further ‘judicial direction’ given on meaning of serious harm under defamation laws, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

Posted January 19th, 2016 in defamation, media, news by sally

‘Courts in England have given further guidance on when statements can be said to have caused or be likely to cause ‘serious harm’ under defamation laws, an expert has said.’

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 15th January 2016

Source: www.out-law.com

Comments Off on Further ‘judicial direction’ given on meaning of serious harm under defamation laws, says expert – OUT-LAW.com

We must choose our words carefully when covering complex legal cases – The Guardian

Posted January 19th, 2016 in Court of Protection, media, medical treatment, mental health, news by sally

‘A recent case that caught the public’s attention shows how writers’ choice of words can, however unintentionally, create a misleading impression.’

Full story

The Guardian, 18th January 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on We must choose our words carefully when covering complex legal cases – The Guardian

Phone hacking: Fresh News of the World claims to be heard – BBC News

Posted January 19th, 2016 in class actions, interception, media, news, telecommunications by sally

‘Fresh claims of phone hacking by the now defunct News of the World newspaper can be heard in court, a High Court judge has ruled.’

Full story

BBC News, 18th January 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off on Phone hacking: Fresh News of the World claims to be heard – BBC News

ECHR not binding over legal costs appeal, rules judge – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted January 15th, 2016 in appeals, freedom of expression, human rights, media, news by sally

‘A costs judge has rejected an attempt by a newspaper group to avoid legal costs because an order infringed its right to freedom of expression.’

Full story

Law Society’s Gazette, 14th January 2016

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Comments Off on ECHR not binding over legal costs appeal, rules judge – Law Society’s Gazette

Corset ad promising ‘sexy, tiny waist’ banned for being irresponsible – The Guardian

Posted January 13th, 2016 in advertising, complaints, media, news by sally

‘A TV ad showing women using a corset to squeeze their waists to a “sexy, tiny” size has been banned for being irresponsible.’

Full story

The Guardian, 13th January 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Corset ad promising ‘sexy, tiny waist’ banned for being irresponsible – The Guardian

Thalidomide 50 years on: ‘Justice has never been done and it burns away’ – Daily Telegraph

Posted January 7th, 2016 in compensation, health, media, medicines, news, reporting restrictions, victims by sally

‘It has been more than half a century since the thalidomide scandal, but Martin Fletcher finds that the victims’ fight for compensation is far from over.’

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 7th January 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Comments Off on Thalidomide 50 years on: ‘Justice has never been done and it burns away’ – Daily Telegraph

Publisher of The Daily Telegraph fined £30,000 for general election email campaign – RPC Data and Privacy Law

Posted January 4th, 2016 in elections, electronic mail, fines, media, news, privacy by sally

‘On 15 December 2015 the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) issued Telegraph Media Group Limited (the Telegraph) with a Monetary Penalty Notice (see here) under section 55A of the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA 1998) following a “serious contravention” of Regulation 22 of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (PECR 2003).’

Full story

RPC Data and Privacy Law, 30th December 2015

Source: www.rpc.co.uk

Comments Off on Publisher of The Daily Telegraph fined £30,000 for general election email campaign – RPC Data and Privacy Law

Phone Hacking and the Level of Damages – Panopticon

Posted December 21st, 2015 in damages, interception, media, news, privacy by sally

‘It is panto season, and everyone loves a good villain. This Christmas’ Wicked Stepmother is the Mirror Group who, when asking ‘Mirror, Mirror on the wall, who is the most liable of them all?’ has received the answer from the Court of Appeal that they are and must pay the consequences.’

Full story

Panopticon, 17th December 2015

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

Comments Off on Phone Hacking and the Level of Damages – Panopticon

‘Plebgate’ and the protection of journalistic sources – Panopticon

Posted December 18th, 2015 in damages, interception, investigatory powers, media, news, police, privacy by tracey

‘It has been a mixed day for the media’s entanglements with the judiciary. Chris Knight posted earlier today about the unhappy outcome for Mirror Group Newspapers before the Court of Appeal in the Gulati privacy damages litigation arising from phone-hacking. News Group Newspapers, however – together with Sun journalist claims Tom Newton Dunn, Anthony France and Craig Woodehouse – had a happier outcome in another case about telephone privacy, though this time with the media as victim rather than perpetrator of the interference.’

Full story

Panopticon, 17th December 2015

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

Comments Off on ‘Plebgate’ and the protection of journalistic sources – Panopticon

Phone hacking: Mirror Group loses appeal over damages – BBC News

Posted December 18th, 2015 in appeals, damages, interception, media, news by tracey

‘Mirror Group Newspapers has lost its appeal over damages paid to eight victims of phone hacking.’

Full story

BBC News, 17th December 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off on Phone hacking: Mirror Group loses appeal over damages – BBC News

Phone hacking: 10 years of resignations, cover-ups and convictions – The Guardian

‘It began in December 2005 when the Metropolitan police started an investigation into the hacking of Prince William’s phone and has ended exactly 10 years later. In the intervening period, hundreds lost their jobs and many more reputations were both shredded and made, mainly on the legal benches.’

Full story

The Guardian, 11th December 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Phone hacking: 10 years of resignations, cover-ups and convictions – The Guardian

CPS ends phone hacking investigations – BBC News

‘No more prosecutions will be brought over alleged phone hacking at newspapers owned by the Mirror Group or News Group Newspapers, prosecutors say.’

Full story

Full CPS press release

BBC News, 11th December 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off on CPS ends phone hacking investigations – BBC News

Court of protection extends ban on naming woman in right-to-die case – The Guardian

Posted December 10th, 2015 in anonymity, assisted suicide, media, news, public interest, reporting restrictions by sally

‘A legal ban preventing identification of a 50-year-old mother who died after refusing lifesaving kidney treatment has been extended by the court of protection.’

Full story

The Guardian, 9th December 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on Court of protection extends ban on naming woman in right-to-die case – The Guardian

That’s Entertainment? The Anonymity of Arrestees and the Law – Doughty Street

‘Last week, The Mirror reported that John Leslie was being questioned by police in connection with an alleged sexual assault. The report contained photographs of the police with evidence bags outside Leslie’s house. The Mirror reminded its readers of allegations made against the former TV presenter in 2002 and 2008. This the most recent example of media reports concerning allegations of sexual offences involving public figures.’

Full story

Doughty Street, 2nd December 2015

Source: www.doughtystreet.co.uk

Comments Off on That’s Entertainment? The Anonymity of Arrestees and the Law – Doughty Street

David Miranda in fresh challenge over Heathrow detention – The Guardian

‘David Miranda, the partner of the former Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, has launched a fresh appeal challenging the legality of his detention under counter-terrorism powers for nine hours at Heathrow airport in 2013.’

Full story

The Guardian, 8th December 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off on David Miranda in fresh challenge over Heathrow detention – The Guardian