Paul Weller wins damages from the Mail Online – BBC News

‘Rock star Paul Weller has won £10,000 damages after pictures of his children were “plastered” on the Mail Online.’

Full story

BBC News, 16th April 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off

Regina (JC and another) v Central Criminal Court (Just for Kids Law intervening) – WLR Daily

Regina (JC and another) v Central Criminal Court (Just for Kids Law intervening): [2014] EWHC 1041 (Admin);   [2014] WLR (D)  166

‘Any order made by any court under section 39 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 prohibiting the identification of (among others) a defendant under the age of 18 years could not extend to reports of the proceedings after the subject of the order had reached the age of majority at 18.’

WLR Daily, 8th April 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Comments Off

The Defamation Act 2013: reflections and reforms – OUP Blog

Posted April 14th, 2014 in anonymity, defamation, freedom of expression, internet, media, news by sally

‘How can a society balance both the freedom of expression, including the freedom of the press, with the individual’s right to reputation? Defamation law seeks to address precisely this delicate equation. Especially in the age of the internet, where it is possible to publish immediately and anonymously, these concerns have become even more pressing and complex. The Defamation Act 2013 has introduced some of the most important changes to this area in recent times, including the defence for honest opinion, new internet-specific reforms protecting internet publishers, and attempts to curb an industry of “libel tourism” in the U.K.’

Full story

OUP Blog, 14th April 2014

Source: www.blog.oup.com

Comments Off

Anonymity protection for under age defendants expires when they are 18: High Court – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted April 10th, 2014 in anonymity, children, explosives, media, news, terrorism, young offenders by sally

‘This case raises the question whether an order made under s. 39 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933 … prohibiting the identification of (among others) a defendant under the age of 18 years, can last indefinitely or whether it automatically expires when that person attains the age of 18 years. It has wide implications not only for young defendants but also for victims, witnesses, others concerned in proceedings and, of course, the media. [Sir Brian Leveson P, giving the judgment of the court , opening the case at para 1].’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 9th April 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Comments Off

Wonga TV advert banned by advertising watchdog – BBC News

Posted April 9th, 2014 in advertising, complaints, loans, media, news by sally

‘A TV advert for payday loans firm Wonga has been banned after the advertising watchdog ruled it confused the public about the interest rates that applied.’


Full story

BBC News, 9th April 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off

Panorama bailiffs investigation to be aired after high court bid fails – The Guardian

Posted April 8th, 2014 in bailiffs, BBC, debts, injunctions, media, news by sally

‘The bailiff and star of BBC show The Enforcers has failed in a high court bid to stop a John Sweeney Panorama investigation into debt recovery being broadcast.’

Full story

The Guardian, 7th April 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Kennedy v Information Commissioner and another (Secretary of State for Justice and others intervening) – WLR Daily

Kennedy v Information Commissioner and another (Secretary of State for Justice and others intervening) [2014] UKSC 20; [2014] WLR (D) 143

‘The Freedom of Information Act 2000 did not provide an exhaustive scheme in respect of the disclosure of information held by the Charity Commission relating to inquiries which they conducted. Although an absolute exemption under section 32(2) of that 2000 Act from disclosure under that Act lasted beyond the completion of such an inquiry, the question whether disclosure of information relating to such an inquiry was available would be governed by the Charities Act 1993, as substituted by the Charities Act 2006, construed in the light of common law principles.’

WLR Daily, 26th March 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Comments Off

FOIA’s not all that: Kennedy v The Charity Commission [2014] UKSC 20 – Panopticon

‘The Supreme Court’s much anticipated judgments in Kennedy v The Charity Commission make for a long read. But they are very important. All the parties in Kennedy were represented by Counsel from 11KBW: Andrew Sharland for Mr Kennedy; Karen Steyn and Rachel Kamm for the Charity Commission and the Secretary of State; Ben Hooper for the ICO; and Christopher Knight for the Media Legal Defence Initiative and Campaign for Freedom of Information.’

Full story

Panopticon, 28th March 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

Comments Off

Contempt of Court: reducing the publisher’s risk of breaching court reporting restrictions – Law Commission

‘The Law Commission is recommending that a new online service be established to help journalists and publishers reporting criminal trials discover whether reporting restrictions are in force and, if so, why. The service would be open to all publishers, from large media organisations to individual bloggers.’

Full story

Law Commission, 26th March 2014

Source: www.lawcommission.justice.gov.uk

Comments Off

R (on the application of British Sky Broadcasting Limited) (Respondent) v The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (Appellant) – Supreme Court

Posted March 25th, 2014 in appeals, law reports, media, official secrets act, police, Supreme Court by sally

R (on the application of British Sky Broadcasting Limited) (Respondent) v The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis (Appellant) [2014] UKSC 17 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 12th March 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

Comments Off

TV licence fee evasion could be decriminalised – The Guardian

Posted March 24th, 2014 in bills, criminal justice, fees, licensing, media, news, prosecutions, statistics by sally

‘The government is to launch a formal review of the law that makes it a crime not to pay the TV licence, following a campaign led by backbench Conservative MPs.’

Full story

The Guardian, 21st March 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Children separated from their families by courts must know why – Daily Telegraph

‘Children separated from their parents in secret family court judgments must be able to find out the reasons for the court’s decisions when they grow up, the most senior family judge has said. Sir James Munby, the President of the Family Division, said it was “great concern” that the judgments of all family court judges were not routinely transcribed and published.’

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 18th May 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Comments Off

Prince Charles, the Guardian and the Unreasonable Veto – Panopticon

‘As promised last week, this post contains a slightly fuller account of the Court of Appeal’s judgment in R (Evans) v HM Attorney General [2014] EWCA Civ 254. The history of the case is manifold and has been covered on this blog innumerable times (see: here, here and here). In essence, the Upper Tribunal held in a very lengthy judgment that some of the correspondence written by Prince Charles to various governmental departments ought to be disclosed in the public interest. The Attorney General then issued his statement of reasons under section 53 FOIA, which has the effect of vetoing the judicial decision. On any view, the veto is a highly unusual provision. The Divisional Court dismissed the judicial review of that veto. Mr Evans, a Guardian journalist, appealed.’

Full story

Panopticon, 18th March 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

Comments Off

TV licence law change plan in motion – BBC News

Posted March 18th, 2014 in BBC, bills, crime, licensing, media, news by tracey

‘A proposal to end the criminal offence of failing to buy a TV licence is
being considered for inclusion in a bill before Parliament.’

Full story

BBC News, 18th March 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off

Prince Charles letters: attorney general acted unlawfully, say senior judges – The Guardian

‘Three senior judges have ruled that Dominic Grieve, the attorney general, acted unlawfully when he blocked the publication of letters written by Prince Charles to government ministers. The ruling, led by Lord Dyson, the head of the civil judiciary in England and Wales, paves the way for the release of the letters which reveal how the prince lobbied government ministers to change official policies.’

Full story

The Guardian, 12th March 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

“The Only Girl in the World”: the Rihanna judgment and the protection of ‘image rights’ in English law – Sports Law Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

Posted March 10th, 2014 in intellectual property, media, news, photography, sport, trade marks by sally

‘Despite the evident commercial value in the ‘image’ of modern sports personalities (indeed there are annual awards held by the BBC to identify the most noteworthy) there is no specific right to protect one’s image under English law. Relying on a cocktail of different causes of action and legal rights, English law offers some protections to a person whose ‘image’ is exploited for commercial reasons. The ingredients include: copyright and trademarks, the torts of defamation, breach of confidence, passing-off as well potentially through statutory rules ensuring data protection.’

Full story

Sports Law Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 7th March 2014

Source: www.sportslawbulletin.org

Comments Off

Non-payment of TV licence fee may be taken out of criminal law – The Guardian

Posted March 8th, 2014 in criminal records, licensing, media, news, prosecutions by sally

‘Plans to decriminalise the non-payment of the TV licence fee are being considered by government departments in a move designed to ease pressure on the courts, but which could have major repercussions for the BBC.’

Full story

The Guardian, 8th March 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Reporting Restrictions and the New Transparency – Part 2 – Family Law Week

‘In the second part of her article reviewing reporting restriction orders and the new transparency Mary Lazarus, barrister of 42 Bedford Row, considers those cases involving aggrieved parties and cases with international implications.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 4th March 2014

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Comments Off

Ukip must be treated like any major party, Ofcom rules – Daily Telegraph

Posted March 4th, 2014 in elections, media, news, ombudsmen, political parties by sally

‘Nigel Farage’s party must be given the same coverage as the Tories, Labour and the Liberal Democrats in the run up to the European elections, the regulator says.’

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 4th March 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Comments Off

Reporting Restrictions and the New Transparency – Part 1 – Family Law Week

‘This is the first part of a three-part article by Mary Lazarus, barrister of 42 Bedford Row, reviewing recent developments concerning reporting restriction orders and transparency in the family courts. In this first part Mary considers some procedural issues before concentrating on those cases involving clashes between the need for privacy and the desire to report issues of genuine public interest.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 27th February 2014

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Comments Off