Supreme Court justices debate decline in dissenting judgments – Litigation Futures

Posted December 19th, 2014 in judgments, judiciary, news, Supreme Court by sally

‘Better teamwork, smaller panels and less controversial cases have all been put forward by a seminar attended by Supreme Court justices and other senior judges as reasons for a decline in dissenting judgments at the court.’

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Litigation Futures, 19th December 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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The Lord Chief Justice’s Report 2014 – Judiciary of England and Wales

‘The Lord Chief Justice has today laid his annual report before Parliament. His report looks back at the past 12 months and explains how the judiciary have administered justice across all jurisdictions by focusing on key priorities.’

Full report

Judiciary of England and Wales, 15th December 2014

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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Being Human Event – The Humanity of Judging – Supreme Court

Posted December 12th, 2014 in judiciary, news, Supreme Court by sally

Being Human Event – The Humanity of Judging (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 19th November 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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When is it time to stop judging? Age Discrimination and the Judiciary – Cloisters

Posted December 11th, 2014 in age discrimination, equality, judges, judiciary, news by sally

‘Mr White, a retired circuit judge, brought claims against the MoJ for age discrimination.

By an amendment, he added claims for breaches under the Part-Time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 and an allegation that the decision not to appoint him to the position of deputy circuit judge after his retirement was an act of age discrimination. These two additional claims were subsequently dismissed on the basis that they were out of time.

The tribunal therefore only considered one issue: is the requirement for a judge to retire on his or her 70th birthday an act of age discrimination?’

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Cloisters, 9th December 2014

Source: www.cloisters.com

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Judicial reviews: a decision that’s best left to judges – The Guardian

‘The justice secretary wants to restrict access to judicial reviews, but judging the lawfulness of executive action should not be a matter for the executive.’

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The Guardian, 10th December 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Peers continue JR resistance as Grayling admits misinforming MPs about changes – Litigation Futures

Posted December 10th, 2014 in bills, costs, judicial review, judiciary, news, parliament by sally

‘The House of Lords yesterday reinstated two of the three amendments it previously passed on the government’s judicial review reforms as it emerged that Lord Chancellor Chris Grayling had given MPs incorrect information over a key aspect of them last week.’

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Litigation Futures, 10th December 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Ethnic minority lawyers nearly four times less likely to be appointed as judges – The Independent

‘Black and minority ethnic lawyers are nearly four times less likely to be appointed as judges than white candidates, according to the latest statistics from the Judicial Appointments Commission (JAC), prompting calls for targets to be introduced.’

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The Independent, 7th December 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Consult judges on devolution, says lord chief justice – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted December 4th, 2014 in bills, devolution, drafting, judges, judiciary, news by sally

‘The lord chief justice has called for judicial engagement in the drafting of new devolution bills that will be brought forward by the next parliament.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 3rd December 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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The Judiciary, the Executive and Parliament: Relationships and the Rule of Law – Speech by Lord Chief Justice

The Judiciary, the Executive and Parliament: Relationships and the Rule of Law (PDF)

Speech by Lord Chief Justice

Institute for Government, 1st December 2014

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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Speech by Lord Chief Justice: Cardiff Business Club – Judiciary of England and Wales

Posted December 1st, 2014 in civil justice, courts, criminal justice, devolution, judiciary, legal aid, speeches, Wales by tracey

‘Speech by The Right Hon. The Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd, Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales at the Cardiff Business Club on 3 November 2014.’

Full speech

Judiciary of England and Wales, 27th November 2014

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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Speech by Master of the Rolls: Criticising Judges: Fair game or off-limits? – Judiciary of England and Wales

Posted December 1st, 2014 in freedom of expression, judiciary, media, speeches by tracey

‘The Master of the Rolls gave the Third Annual BAILII Lecture on 27 November 2014.’

Full speech

Judiciary of England and Wales, 28th November 2014

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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Tax Tribunal backlog reaches record high – OUT-LAW.com

Posted November 25th, 2014 in delay, judiciary, news, taxation, tribunals by sally

‘The backlog of tax disputes waiting to be heard has reached a new record high with a particular surge in the number of high value cases lodged with the Upper Tribunal, according to Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind Out-Law.com.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 25th November 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Employment tribunal did research on Wikipedia “to help litigant in person” – Litigation Futures

‘An employment tribunal which decided to carry out its own internet research, apparently to help a litigant in person, has been condemned by Mr Justice Langstaff, president of the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT).’

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Litigation Futures, 20th November 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Allegations Of Bias In Long And Complex Cases – Littleton Chambers

Posted November 18th, 2014 in appeals, bias, judiciary, news, recusal by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has handed down guidance on the approach to take to allegations of bias in long-running cases where a judge has substantial involvement in the prior stages of a case’s history.’

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Littleton Chambers, 27th October 2014

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

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Colm O’Cinneide and Kate Malleson: Are quotas for judicial appointments lawful under EU law? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In April 2014 Sadiq Khan, Shadow Secretary of State for Justice, asked Karon Monaghan QC and Geoffrey Bindman QC to review the options for a future Labour Government to improve diversity in the judiciary. On November 6th their report, entitled “Judicial Diversity: Accelerating change”, was published. Starting from the premise that “[t]he near absence of women and Black, Asian and minority ethnic judges in the senior judiciary is no longer tolerable”, it proposes a range of recommendations designed to speed up the glacial pace of change. Perhaps the most controversial of these is for the introduction of a quota system for women and BAME candidates. The report reviews the use of quotas in other UK institutions as well as their use in judicial appointments processes around the world, before addressing the question of whether such quotas would be lawful under EU law. This is a key question: EU law casts a long shadow in this context, as the Monaghan and Bindman report makes clear, given that any legislation enacted in Westminster to give effect to a quota system in the process of judicial appointments must conform to the requirements of EU law.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 12th November 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Conor Gearty: On Fantasy Island: British politics, English judges and the European Convention on Human Rights – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘My first encounter with the fantasies that underpin English public law came in the 1980s. I had just starting teaching constitutional law and was taking my first year students through Dicey: the independent rule of law; the availability of remedies to all, without fear or favour; the common law’s marvellous protection of civil liberties; how great we were, how terrible the continent; and all the rest of it. Outside the classroom, striking miners were being routinely beaten up by the police, their picketing disrupted by road blocks, their liberty eroded by mass bail conditions. The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament was having its marches banned and its protests inhibited by ‘no-go’ areas arbitrarily erected by the police around American bases into which it had been decided to move a new generation of nuclear weapons. Some of my students were even beaten up themselves, on a march against education cuts in London – much to their surprise given what I was teaching them.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 13th November 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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‘Wholly antiquated’: lord chief justice on court technology – LegalVoice

‘Our “antiquated” courts faced “severe crisis” without significant investment, the lord chief justice said yesterday. Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd offered journalists a judicial perspective on the financial pressures being imposed upon the courts at his annual press conference.’

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LegalVoice, 13th November 2014

Source: www.legalvoice.org.uk

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Retiring law firm partners to be offered short cut to senior judiciary – Legal Futures

Posted November 14th, 2014 in diversity, judiciary, law firms, news by tracey

‘There is to be a drive to recruit retiring law firm partners to the senior judiciary in a bid to improve diversity, it has emerged.’

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Legal Futures, 14th November 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Major report calls for quotas to increase diversity at top of judiciary – Litigation Futures

Posted November 6th, 2014 in consultations, diversity, judiciary, news, part-time work, reports by sally

‘A quota system should be introduced to address the under-representation of women and ethnic minority judges, a major independent report commissioned by the Labour Party has recommended.’

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Litigation Futures, 6th November 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Patrick O’Brien: How active were pre-2009 judges as parliamentarians? – UK Constitutional Law Association

Posted October 28th, 2014 in constitutional reform, judges, judiciary, news, parliament by sally

‘Is the question of anything more than historical interest? The Constitutional Reform Act 2005 precluded judicial peers from contributing to parliamentary debate from 1 October 2009. Many of the Law Lords were opposed to the change, and many judges are at least nostalgic for the past arrangements. The current Lord Chief Justice (LCJ) of England and Wales, Lord Thomas, and his immediate predecessor, Lord Judge, have both publicly regretted the fact that they cannot speak in Parliament on matters of importance to the judiciary. To the extent that the outlook of judges today is shaped partly by the feeling that they have lost a valuable platform, the issue is worth exploring. In fact judges were very infrequent contributors to parliamentary debate. Whilst past Lord Chief Justices – and other judicial peers – may have occasionally used the chamber of the Lords as a platform for articulating judicial viewpoints, all things considered they did so rarely.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 28th October 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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