Kennedy (Appellant) v The Charity Commission (Respondent) – Supreme Court

Kennedy (Appellant) v The Charity Commission (Respondent) [2014] UKSC 20 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 26th March 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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MoD burdened by unprecedented rise in court actions, MPs warn – The Guardian

‘An unprecedented rise in court actions is placing a huge burden on the Ministry of Defence and could have the unintended consequence of leading to even more civilian casualties, according to a report by MPs.’

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The Guardian, 2nd April 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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FOIA’s not all that: Kennedy v The Charity Commission [2014] UKSC 20 – Panopticon

‘The Supreme Court’s much anticipated judgments in Kennedy v The Charity Commission make for a long read. But they are very important. All the parties in Kennedy were represented by Counsel from 11KBW: Andrew Sharland for Mr Kennedy; Karen Steyn and Rachel Kamm for the Charity Commission and the Secretary of State; Ben Hooper for the ICO; and Christopher Knight for the Media Legal Defence Initiative and Campaign for Freedom of Information.’

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Panopticon, 28th March 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Supreme Court: Strasbourg’s mixed messages about Article 10 and any right to receive information – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Kennedy v. Charity Commission et al, Supreme Court, 26 March 2014. In judgments running to 90 pages, the Supreme Court dismissed this appeal by Mr Kennedy, a Times journalist, for access to documents generated by the Charity Commission under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 concerning three inquiries between 2003 and 2005 into the Mariam Appeal. This appeal was George Galloway’s response to the sanctions imposed on Iraq following the first Gulf War, and little Mariam was a leukaemia sufferer. Mr Kennedy’s suspicion, amongst others, was that charitable funds had been used by Galloway for political campaigning.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 26th March 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Prisoners’ Legal Aid, Malayan Killings and the Role of the Judiciary – the Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

‘This week, a challenge to the legal aid reforms by the Howard League for Penal Reform is rejected, while campaigners seeking an inquiry into the action of British soldiers in Malaya in 1948 face similar disappointment. Meanwhile, some of the most senior judges in the UK give their views on the role of the judiciary today.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 23rd March 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Al-Sweady Inquiry: Iraq unlawful killings claims dropped – BBC News

Posted March 20th, 2014 in armed forces, inquiries, Iraq, news, unlawful killing by tracey

‘Claims that UK soldiers unlawfully killed Iraqi civilians in 2004 have not been supported by evidence heard by a public inquiry into their deaths, lawyers for their families have said.’

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BBC News, 20th March 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Pressure grows for inquiry into UK role in Iraq ‘war crimes’ – The Independent

‘Legal experts from around the world are to join calls for an investigation into whether British politicians and senior military figures should be prosecuted for alleged war crimes in Iraq.’

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The Independent, 12th January 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Inquiry Impasse, Charter Confusion and Competition Time – The Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted November 25th, 2013 in asylum, detention, EC law, human rights, inquiries, Iraq, news, terrorism, torture by tracey

‘This week, there are criticisms over the delay of inquiries both into the mistreatment of terrorism suspects and the Iraq War. Meanwhile, discussion continues over the relevance of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights for UK law, and a dying asylum seeker on hunger strike will not be released.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 24th November 2013

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Bomb detector conman James McCormick loses appeal bid – BBC News

Posted November 13th, 2013 in appeals, confiscation, explosives, fraud, Iraq, news, sentencing by tracey

“A UK businessman who sold fake bomb detectors around the world has lost a challenge against his 10-year sentence.”

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BBC News, 12th November 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

 

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Iraq war inquiry blocked in bid to make Bush-Blair ‘kick ass’ memo public – The Guardian

Posted November 11th, 2013 in disclosure, inquiries, international relations, Iraq, news by michael

“Cabinet Office resists Chilcot’s request to disclose what the allied leaders said in the escalation to war.”

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The Guardian, 9th November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Iraq Inquiry: Hold-up over access to key documents – BBC News

Posted November 7th, 2013 in delay, disclosure, documents, inquiries, Iraq, news by tracey

“The Iraq Inquiry says it cannot proceed with the next phase of its work because key information, including correspondence between Tony Blair and George W Bush, has yet to be released.”

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BBC News, 6th November 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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HF(Iraq) and others v Secretary of State for the Home Department; MK(Iraq) v Same – WLR Daily

Posted October 30th, 2013 in appeals, EC law, human rights, immigration, Iraq, law reports, tribunals by sally

HF(Iraq) and others v Secretary of State for the Home Department; MK(Iraq) v Same [2013] EWCA Civ 1276; [2013] WLR (D) 407

“There was no presumption that the eligibility guidelines issued by the UNHCR in relation to Iraq should be followed unless there were cogent reasons for not doing so.”

WLR Daily, 23rd October 2013

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Legal claims ‘could paralyse’ armed forces – BBC News

“A ‘sustained legal assault’ on British forces could have ‘catastrophic consequences’ for the safety of the nation, an influential right-leaning think tank has warned.”

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BBC News, 18th October 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Man cannot be stripped of British citizenship, rules Supreme Court – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 14th, 2013 in appeals, citizenship, human rights, Iraq, news, public interest, Supreme Court by sally

“In late 2007, the Secretary of State for the Home Department made an order depriving Mr Al Jedda, who had been granted British citizenship in 2000, of his citizenship, under the British Nationality Act 1981. Section 40(4) of the Act prohibits the deprivation of nationality where the effect would be to render the person stateless.”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 14th October 2013

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Secretary of State for the Home Department (Appellant) v Al-Jedda (Respondent) – Supreme Court

Posted October 9th, 2013 in appeals, citizenship, immigration, Iraq, judicial review, law reports, Supreme Court by sally

Secretary of State for the Home Department (Appellant) v Al-Jedda (Respondent) [2013] UKSC 62 | UKSC 2012/0129 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 9th October 2013

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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Further guidance on the conduct of Iraqi death inquiries – High Court – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 4th, 2013 in armed forces, families, inquiries, Iraq, news, unlawful killing by sally

“Earlier this year, the High Court ordered that an approach based upon a coroner’s inquest would be the most appropriate form of inquiry under Article 2 EHCR into claims of ill treatment or killings of civilians by the British armed forces in Iraq (see Adam Wagner’s post on this decision). Here the President of the Queen’s Bench sets out the Court’s views as to the form such inquiries should take.”

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UK Human Rights Blog, 3rd October 2013

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Army could have done more to stop soldier dying from heat, says coroner – The Guardian

Posted September 24th, 2013 in armed forces, health, health & safety, inquests, Iraq, news by sally

“Army chiefs could have done more to make sure soldiers were protected against the effects of soaring temperatures, a coroner has concluded after hearing the case of a reservist who died after suffering heat stroke in Iraq.”

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The Guardian, 23rd September 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Gavin Phillipson: ‘Historic’ Commons’ Syria vote: the constitutional significance (Part I) – UK Constitutional Law Group

Posted September 20th, 2013 in chemical weapons, constitutional law, Iraq, news, parliament, war by sally

“Does the recent vote in the House of Commons on military action against Syria have real constitutional significance? Is it the final piece of evidence that there is a constitutional convention that the consent of the House of Commons must be sought before armed force is used? If so, should anything be done to concretise and clarify this Convention? And what is the broader constitutional significance of this episode in terms of the evolution of controls over the prerogative power and its significance for the evolving separation of powers in the UK?”

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UK Constitutional Law Group, 19th September 2013

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Red Caps’ families take legal action for public inquiry – BBC News

Posted September 6th, 2013 in armed forces, crime, human rights, inquiries, Iraq, murder, news by tracey

“The families of four Royal Military Police NCOs killed by an Iraqi mob are to bring a Human Rights Act claim to try to force a public inquiry.”

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BBC News, 5th September 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Al-Sweady inquiry: British soldiers to accuse colleagues of abusing Iraqis – The Guardian

Posted September 4th, 2013 in armed forces, evidence, inquiries, Iraq, news, torture, unlawful killing by sally

“British soldiers have accused colleagues of abusing Iraqis they shot or detained after an intense gunfight with insurgents in 2004, the inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the incident heard on Tuesday.”

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The Guardian, 3rd September 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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