Surveillance watchdog warns police over false identities on social media – The Guardian

Posted September 5th, 2014 in identity fraud, internet, investigatory powers, news, police by tracey

‘Police officers and others public authorities who use false identities to disguise their online presence when they use social media to investigate a suspect’s personal lifestyle or associates without authorisation have been warned by the chief surveillance watchdog.’

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The Guardian, 4th September 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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DRIP – Data Retention Regulations come into force – Panopticon

‘The introduction of the controversial draft Data Retention Regulations 2014 has already been discussed by my colleague Robin Hopkins in his excellent post last month. The Regulations now have the force of law, having come into force on 31 July 2014 – see the Regulations here. In his post, Robin made the point that, following the judgment in Digital Rights Ireland, there were two methods for curtailing the infringement of privacy rights presupposed by the existing communications data retention (CDR) regime: either cut back on the data retention requirements provided for under the legislation, so as generally to limit the potential for interference with privacy rights, or introduce more robust safeguards with a view to ensuring that any interference with privacy rights is proportionate and otherwise justified. The Government, which has evidently opted for the latter approach in the new Regulations, will now need to persuade a somewhat sceptical public that the safeguards which have been adopted in the legislation strike the right balance as between the protection of privacy rights on the one hand and the imperative to support criminal law enforcement functions on the other.’

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Panopticon, 5th August 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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The death of privacy – The Guardian

‘Google knows what you’re looking for. Facebook knows what you like. Sharing is the norm, and secrecy is out. But what is the psychological and cultural fallout from the end of privacy?’

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The Guardian, 3rd August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Drip surveillance law faces legal challenge by MPs – The Guardian

‘The application for a judicial review of the new legislation, which was passed with support from the three main parties, is to be mounted by the human rights organisation Liberty on behalf of the two backbench MPs.’

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The Guardian, 22nd July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UK definition of terrorism ‘could catch political journalists and bloggers’ – The Guardian

Posted July 23rd, 2014 in investigatory powers, news, statutory interpretation, terrorism by michael

‘The current British definition of terrorism is so broadly drawn that it could even catch political journalists and bloggers who publish material that the authorities consider dangerous to public safety, said the official counter-terrorism watchdog.’

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The Guardian, 22nd July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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DRIP: 5 unjust government arguments – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘It is suggested that the USA PATRIOT Act, legislation swiftly enacted by US Congress in the wake of the 11 September 2001 terrorist act was a “backronym” designed to play on the national pride around at the time. Clever political manoeuvring? Potentially so.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 16th July 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Will Drip law make UK citizens’ data more attractive to hackers? – The Guardian

‘The Data Retention and Investigatory Powers (Drip) bill that yesterday cleared the House of Lords will make companies holding UK citizens’ communications data far more attractive to criminal hackers, a security expert has warned.’

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The Guardian, 18th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Data Retention & Investigatory Powers Bill receives Royal Assent – Home Office

‘Legislation to ensure UK law enforcement and intelligence agencies continue to have access to the vital evidence and information they need to investigate criminal activity, prevent terrorism and protect the public has today (Thursday 17 July) received Royal Assent.’

Full press release

Home Office, 17th July 2014

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

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Terrorism laws watchdog issues warning over security services scrutiny – The Guardian

‘David Anderson says privacy and civil liberties board that is planned to replace his job must have unfettered access.’

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The Guardian, 17th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Tom Hickman: Further Concerns about the DRIP Bill – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In a blog post on Monday I expressed concerns about the lack of time for proper scrutiny of the changes to be brought in by the DRIP Bill. Towards the end of that blog I expressed puzzlement at a change to be made to the definition of “telecommunications system” in RIPA. This definition is central to the scheme of RIPA and is the basis for many of the powers therein.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 16th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

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Emergency surveillance bill clears Commons – The Guardian

‘Controversial emergency surveillance legislation has cleared the Commons after an extended sitting and angry exchanges alleging an abuse of parliament.’

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The Guardian, 16th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Tom Hickman on the DRIP Bill: Plugging Gaps in Surveillance Laws or Authorising the Unlawful? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The unveiling last Thursday of a a draft bill on surveillance powers that is to be rushed through Parliament brought to mind the story of the Dutch boy who finds a hole in a dyke on his way to school and puts his finger in it to plug the leak until help arrives to shore it up. The legislation is said to be necessary to plug what the Government regards as holes in the regime of surveillance and investigatory powers pending a full review. The fact that the bill is titled the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill – the “DRIP” bill – may mean I am not the first person to draw the analogy. But the analogy may not be entirely apt. An examination of the DRIP Bill reveals that it is not addressing little holes in the regime but in fact profoundly important and substantial issues.’

Full text

UK Constitutional Law Association, 14th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

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NSA surveillance data: UK access to information faces legal challenge – The Guardian

‘The biggest domestic legal challenge to UK intelligence agencies accessing the mass data harvested by the US National Security Agency (NSA) begins on Monday, and may be one reason behind the government’s decision to introduce emergency surveillance laws into parliament next week, campaigners have suggested.’

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The Guardian, 11th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Tribunal to hear legal challenge to GCHQ surveillance claims – BBC News

‘A tribunal is to hear a legal challenge by civil liberty groups against the alleged use of mass surveillance programmes by UK intelligence services.’

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BBC News, 14th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Emergency data law: What you need to know about the bill that makes ISPs store your data – The Independent

‘The Government has caused uproar this morning by introducing an emergency bill that forces telecom companies to store users’ personal data for 12 months despite the European Union ruling this April that such powers are illegal.’

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The Independent, 10th July 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Surveillance law wins cross-party support but critics claim stitch-up – The Guardian

‘David Cameron and his Liberal Democrat deputy, Nick Clegg, have unveiled emergency surveillance legislation that will shore up government powers to require phone and internet companies to retain and hand over data to the security services.

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The Guardian, 10th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Ministers push for new legislation to track phone usage – The Guardian

‘Ministers are poised to pass emergency laws to require phone companies to log records of phone calls, texts and internet usage, but Labour and Liberal Democrats are warning that they will not allow any new law to become a backdoor route to reinstating a wider “snooper’s charter”.’

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The Guardian, 6th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Mass surveillance of social media is permitted by law, says top UK official – The Guardian

‘Mass surveillance of social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, and even Google searches, is permissible because these are “external communications”, according to the government’s most senior security official.’

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The Guardian, 17th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Women duped by undercover officers challenge attempt to block lawsuit – The Guardian

Posted June 6th, 2014 in disclosure, investigatory powers, news, police, spying by sally

‘Women who say they were deceived into forming long-term, sexual relationships with undercover police officers are challenging “absurd, shambolic and incoherent” attempts by police chiefs to block their lawsuit, the high court has heard.’

Full story

The Guardian, 5th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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PACE Code C – Home Office

Posted May 15th, 2014 in codes of practice, detention, investigatory powers, police by tracey

‘This revised version of PACE Code C sets out the requirements for the detention, treatment and questioning of suspects not related to terrorism in police custody by police officers. The revised 2014 code was laid in Parliament on 14 May 2014 and will only apply after midnight on 2 June 2014.’

Full text

Home Office, 14th May 2014

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

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