Leveson inquiry: The spy, the judge and the ‘cover-up’ – The Independent

Posted March 3rd, 2014 in complaints, corruption, inquiries, interception, judges, media, news, ombudsmen, police, privacy by sally

‘Sir Brian Leveson “pulled his punches” over evidence of “serious police corruption at the very highest level” because it was “too hot to handle”, according to a complaint that has been lodged with the judicial watchdog by a News of the World hacking victim.’

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The Independent, 2nd March 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Barristers tell Parliament that some GCHQ mass surveillance is illegal – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Two barristers have advised a Parliamentary committee that some mass surveillance allegedly undertaken by the UK’s security services is probably illegal. Jemima Stratford QC and Tim Johnston’s advice (PDF) was commissioned by the chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Drones.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 29th January 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Google will not answer to British court over UK privacy claim – The Guardian

‘Google has been called “arrogant and immoral” for arguing that a privacy claim brought by internet users in the UK should not be heard by the British legal system.’

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The Guardian, 15th December 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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World’s leading authors: state surveillance of personal data is theft – The Guardian

Posted December 10th, 2013 in data protection, interception, investigatory powers, news, theft, whistleblowers by tracey

‘More than 500 of the world’s leading authors, including five Nobel prize winners, have condemned the scale of state surveillance revealed by the whistleblower Edward Snowden and warned that spy agencies are undermining democracy and must be curbed by a new international charter.’

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The Guardian, 10th December 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Suspension ordered for ‘win at all costs’ Times solicitor – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The Times newspaper’s former legal director is to be suspended from practising for six months from 16 December after a Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal hearing ruled that he had knowingly allowed a court to be misled through his “win at all costs” approach.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 6th December 2013

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Ex-Times lawyer to face tribunal over claims he allowed court to be misled – The Guardian

‘The former legal manager of the Times newspaper is to appear before a tribunal this week over an allegation that he allowed a court to be misled over the unmasking of a detective writing the anonymous Nightjack blog.’

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The Guardian, 2nd December 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Hacking trial: The story so far – BBC News

Posted November 18th, 2013 in conspiracy, electronic mail, interception, media, news, telecommunications by sally

The trial of former News of the World journalists accused of a conspiracy to hack mobile phones is now well under way at the Old Bailey.

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BBC News, 16th November 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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UK objects to attempt by Council of Europe to examine online spying – The Guardian

“Britain is delaying the publication of a declaration on internet freedom by the 47 members of Europe’s human rights watchdog after objecting to a probe into the gathering of ‘vast amounts of electronic data’ by intelligence agencies.”

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The Guardian, 8th November 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Four admit to phone-hacking plots in Coulson and Brooks eras – The Guardian

Posted October 31st, 2013 in conspiracy, corruption, interception, media, news, telecommunications by michael

“Three former news editors from the News of the World have pleaded guilty to conspiracy to hack mobile phones during a six-year period when Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson were editing the Sunday title, it was disclosed in court.”

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The Guardian, 31st October 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Press regulation: The 10 major questions – BBC News

“The Royal Charter on press regulation is expected to be approved later. What are the major questions that have defined the debate?”

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BBC News, 30th October 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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‘British justice on trial’: Judge urges phone-hacking jury to consider only the evidence presented to them – The Independent

“The jury that will decide the guilt or innocence of Rebekah Brooks, Andy Coulson and six other defendants was sworn in at the Old Bailey with a warning from the judge that ‘British justice is on trial’.”

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The Independent, 30th October 2013

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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SFO could snoop on communications to uncover evidence of corruption, says director – OUT-LAW.com

“The director of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has warned that the agency may use powers of surveillance to uncover evidence of corruption within corporates.”

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OUT-LAW.com, 25th October 2013

Source: www.out-law.com

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Phone-hacking: trial of Andy Coulson and Rebekah Brooks to begin – The Guardian

“The trial of former News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks and others linked with alleged phone-hacking at the now-defunct News of the World will begin on Monday at the Old Bailey, kicking off what is likely to be one of the longest criminal trials in recent memory.”

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The Guardian, 28th October 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UK’s top prosecutor defends journalists who break law in public interest – The Guardian

“Britain’s most senior prosecutor has launched a robust defence of journalists who break the law pursuing investigations that have a genuine public interest. Legal guidelines had been drafted, he said, to protect reporters.”

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The Guardian, 18th October 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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GCHQ accused of monitoring privileged emails between lawyers and clients – The Guardian

“GCHQ is probably intercepting legally privileged communications between lawyers and their clients, according to a detailed claim filed on behalf of eight Libyans involved in politically sensitive compensation battles with the UK.”

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The Guardian, 13th October 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Katie Price settles phone-hacking claim – BBC News

Posted October 10th, 2013 in damages, interception, media, news, telecommunications by tracey

“Model and TV personality Katie Price has received undisclosed damages over phone hacking, the High Court has heard.”

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BBC News, 9th October 2013

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Press regulation debate nears final reckoning – The Guardian

Posted September 30th, 2013 in codes of practice, interception, media, news, Privy Council, regulations by sally

“The marathon battle to introduce a new system of press regulation will come to a head on 9 October when the privy council is due to decide whether to seal a royal charter enshrining the industry’s preferred system of self-regulation.”

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The Guardian, 27th September 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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UK’s surveillance laws need overhaul, says former defence secretary – The Guardian

“Laws used by Britain’s spy agencies to justify mass surveillance and interception techniques must be reviewed to ensure they have kept pace with ‘incredible changes’ in communications, one of the country’s foremost intelligence experts has said.”

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The Guardian, 26th September 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Privacy International to challenge telecoms firms over GCHQ cooperation – The Guardian

“BT and Vodafone are among seven large telecoms firms which could be pulled into a legal challenge under human rights law for cooperating with GCHQ’s large-scale internet surveillance programs.”

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The Guardian, 8th August 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Guardian rejects press watchdog as ‘own goal’ threatening independence – The Guardian

Posted August 7th, 2013 in interception, media, news, privacy, regulations, victims by sally

“The publisher of the Guardian has rejected a new press self-regulator as proposed by the industry, saying that the proposed funding method threatens its independence and that the biggest national newspapers will call the shots.”

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The Guardian, 6th August 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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