Naked Rambler loses at European court over right to public nudity – The Guardian

‘A man known as the Naked Rambler has lost his case at the European court of human rights where, he claimed he had a right to bare all in public.’

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The Guardian, 28th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Can a kiss on a bus count as public disorder? – The Guardian

Posted October 21st, 2014 in freedom of expression, homosexuality, human rights, news, public order by sally

‘The song was wrong – a kiss isn’t just a kiss. Or at least not on the No 89 to Blackheath, according to two passengers who say they were kicked off their London bus when the driver objected to their public display of affection.’

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The Guardian, 20th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Internet trolls face four times longer in jail, Chris Grayling pledges – The Guardian

‘Internet trolls who spread “venom” on social media could be jailed for up to two years, the justice secretary Chris Grayling has said as he announced plans to quadruple the maximum prison sentence.’

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The Guardian, 19th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Authors’ concerns after court rules writer can’t publish sex abuse memoir – Daily Telegraph

‘Leading authors have expressed their “grave concern” at a court ruling which has prevented a writer from publishing a book dealing with the sexual abuse he suffered as a child. The author’s ex-wife has obtained a temporary injunction stopping the memoir’s release until the issue has been decided at trial. She argued that reading it would cause their 11 year-old son, who suffers from a number of disabilities, severe psychological harm.’

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Daily Telegraph, 16th October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Binning the smoke alarm: Why repealing the Human Rights Act would be the biggest mistake of a generation – Doughty Street Chambers

‘Following plans announced at the Conservative Party’s recent conference to withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights, Harriet Johnson reminds us why we signed it in the first place, and underlines why it remains such an important safeguard over half a century later.’

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Doughty Street Chambers, 3rd October 2014

Source: www.doughtystreet.co.uk

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The Supreme Court and the Rule of Law – Speech by Lord Neuberger

The Supreme Court and the Rule of Law (PDF)

Lord Neuberger

The Conkerton Lecture 2014, Liverpool Law Society, 9th October 2014

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

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Keynote speech by Lord Neuberger at 5 RB Conference on the Internet, 30 September 2014 – Supreme Court

Posted October 2nd, 2014 in freedom of expression, internet, privacy, speeches by tracey

‘”What’s in a name?” – Privacy and anonymous speech on the Internet.’

Full speech

Supreme Court, 30th September 2014

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

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When does a righteous campaign shade into harassment? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 1st, 2014 in freedom of expression, harassment, human rights, injunctions, news by tracey

‘Merlin Entertainments LPC, Chessington World of Adventures Operations and others v Peter Cave [2014] EWHC 3036 (QB) 25 September 2014. This case explores the extent to which a campaign of criticism, conducted by internet and email, can merit restraint by the civil courts. As the judge says, whatever the aims of the campaign in question, its supporters may, in the course of their activities, annoy, irritate, and upset companies and individuals. But should the courts interfere, before the question whether the campaign is justified has been decided? And to what extent is such a campaign a criminal offence?’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 30th September 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Law firm wins injunction against former client over online harassment – Legal Futures

Posted September 29th, 2014 in defamation, freedom of expression, harassment, injunctions, internet, law firms, news by tracey

‘A law firm has won an injunction against a former client who set up websites about the firm with its name in the URL, after the High Court deemed his actions to be harassment.’

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Legal Futures, 29th September 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Victims’ Rights, the EU Charter, and Passport Confiscation – the Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

‘In recent news, the government outlines proposals for increased rights for the victims of crime, as well as for the revocation and confiscation of passports for ISIS fighters returning to the UK. In other news, the legality of the EU Charter comes back to haunt Chris Grayling once again.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 15th September 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Data protection and journalism – ICO publishes guidance – Panopticon

‘The Information Commissioner has today published his keenly anticipated guidance on ‘Data Protection and Journalism: A Guide for the Media’. The guidance has been published following a lengthy consultative process and in response to a recommendation made in the Leveson report.’

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Panopticon, 4th September 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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M v Times Newspapers Ltd and others – WLR Daily

M v Times Newspapers Ltd and others [2014] EWCA Civ 1132; [2014] WLR (D) 371

‘The decision of a court to allow publication of a report which might lead to the identification of a person who had been arrested but not charged with any offence and was not a party to criminal proceedings would not be interfered with unless the court, in carrying out the evaluative exercise of balancing the competing public interest of freedom of expression in a report of court proceedings against the person’s right to private and family life, had erred in principle or reached a conclusion which was plainly wrong.’

WLR Daily, 1st August 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Wikipedia link to be hidden in Google under ‘right to be forgotten’ law – The Guardian

Posted August 4th, 2014 in freedom of expression, internet, news, privacy, statistics by sally

Google is set to restrict search terms to a link to a Wikipedia article, in the first request under Europe’s controversial new “right to be forgotten” legislation to affect the 110m-page encyclopaedia.

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The Guardian, 2nd August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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The death of privacy – The Guardian

‘Google knows what you’re looking for. Facebook knows what you like. Sharing is the norm, and secrecy is out. But what is the psychological and cultural fallout from the end of privacy?’

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The Guardian, 3rd August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Google “Right to be forgotten” – freedom of expression v privacy – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted July 21st, 2014 in EC law, freedom of expression, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘In the context of the draft EU General Data Protection Regulations (the Draft Regulations) – which will replace the current EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC (the Directive) – should the European Court of Justice’s (ECJ) Google Spain “Right to be forgotten” ruling be welcomed? Is it testing the “right to be forgotten” contained in the Draft Regulations before it is enshrined in legislation, or does it simply amount to the clumsy implementation of a “new” right without a democratic debate on its wider implications?’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 17th July 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Tory Human Rights Plans, Child Abuse Inquiry and the Burqa Ban – the Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted July 17th, 2014 in bills, freedom of expression, human rights, inquiries, judges, news by tracey

‘This week, the role of Lady Butler-Sloss in the forthcoming inquiry into child abuse is challenged, while the government pushes for emergency legislation to monitor phone and internet records. Meanwhile, the European Court of Human Right upholds France’s niqab ban and the Tories get closer to announcing their plans for human rights reform.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 17th July 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Religion, the Rule of Law and Discrimination – Gresham College

‘This address will explore the development of the law’s approach at the intersection between, on the one hand, the manifestation of religious beliefs and, on the other, the protection and promotion of secular values.
It charts the shift from the historic protection of Christian orthodoxy, through the development of anti-discrimination legislation, to the recent domestic and European legislation and case law which have provided a coherent framework for the balancing of these rights consistent with the values of the Rule of Law.’

Transcript

Gresham College, 26th June 2014

Source: www.gresham.ac.uk

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France’s ban on religious clothing in schools did not prevent removal of asylum seeker there under Dublin Regulation – UK Human Rights Blog

‘France is a country which observes its Convention obligations therefore it is not in breach of Article 3 or any other of the Convention’s provisions to return an asylum seeker thence under the Dublin Regulation, since that system provides that once a Member State has “taken charge” of an application for asylum (as France has in this case) it has exclusive responsibility for processing and determining the claim for asylum. The prohibition on religious clothing in public schools in France did not disclose a threat to the second appellant’s Convention rights.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 1st July 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Is it right to jail someone for being offensive on Facebook or Twitter? – The Guardian

‘Jake Newsome was jailed last week for posting offensive comments online. His is the latest in a string of cases that have led to prison terms, raising concern that free speech may be under threat from over-zealous prosecutors.’

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The Guardian, 13th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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‘New press regulator will result in more false stories that victimise the weak’ – The Guardian

Posted June 2nd, 2014 in complaints, freedom of expression, inquiries, media, news by sally

‘The big newspaper groups are setting up their own industry watchdog, Ipso, but it will be a toothless creature loyal only to its keepers, not the public.’

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The Guardian, 31st May 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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