And There Lurks the Minotaur: The Interrelationship Between the Inherent Jurisdiction and Section 25, CA 1989: Part I – Family Law Week

Posted June 24th, 2016 in children, family courts, jurisdiction, news by tracey

‘Alex Laing, barrister of Coram Chambers, considers the interrelationship of the inherent jurisdiction and secure accommodation.’

Full story

Family Law week, 22nd June 2016

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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Family President orders re-hearing of fact finding in case where boy adopted – Local Government Lawyer

Posted June 23rd, 2016 in adoption, children, evidence, family courts, news by sally

‘The President of the Family Division has ordered the re-opening of a finding of fact hearing in care proceedings where a boy was later adopted.’

Full story

Local Government Lawyer, 22nd June 2016

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

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Ellie Butler judge ‘took unwarranted steps’ to reunite her with violent parents – The Guardian

‘A senior judge in the family court took “unwarranted” extra steps in reuniting a man with a violent and criminal past with his young daughter 11 months before he beat her to death, the author of a serious case review has said.’

Full story

The Guardian, 22nd June 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Activities of McKenzie Friends in family courts to go under the microscope – The Bar Council

Posted June 16th, 2016 in family courts, McKenzie friends, press releases by tracey

‘The activities of unregulated, untrained and uninsured McKenzie Friends in the family courts is to come under the microscope with the commissioning of field research by the Bar Council into how they handle court work.’

Full press release

The Bar Council, 10th June 2016

Source: www.barcouncil.org.uk

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In re A (A Child) (Baby Relinquished for Adoption: Case Management)

In re A (A Child) (Baby Relinquished for Adoption: Case Management) [2016] EWFC 25

‘A, a baby born in England to Latvian parents, was relinquished at birth for adoption and quickly placed with foster parents who were approved to adopt. On the understanding that there was no one within the extended natural family, either in England or in Latvia, in a position to care for A, and with the consent of the birth parents given in accordance with sections 19 and 20 of the Adoption and Children Act 2002, the local authority proceeded to convert A’s short-term arrangements to an adoptive placement and notified the Latvian central authority of A’s situation. The foster parents, with whom A had lived for much of his life, applied to adopt him. The Latvian central authority, having made its own enquiries of relatives in Latvia, identified the maternal grandmother as a potential long-term carer for A, had completed a favourable preliminary suitability assessment and commissioned a full suitability assessment. The central authority opposed the adoption of A in England and submitted its concerns that the approach of the English courts towards adoption cases placed insufficient weight on the rights of a child to grow up in his inherited culture and was therefore potentially contrary to articles 36 and 37 of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations 1963 and a breach of articles 8 and 20 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989. The birth mother, who had deliberately not informed her wider family in Latvia of the proposed adoption, continued to support adoption by the foster parents, maintaining her opinion that an education and upbringing in England would be in A’s best interests and that her mother would find it difficult physically and financially to care for A. At a case management hearing, the children’s guardian appointed for A recommended an adjournment to enable completion of the grandmother’s assessment. In circumstances where the prospective adopters, the birth parents and the local authority all supported the adoption, where factors from the welfare checklist in section 1(4) of the 2002 Act pointed towards adoption, and where a delay in making a decision was likely to prejudice A’s welfare, the issue before the judge was whether he should make an adoption order without having considered the substantial assessment of the suitability of the maternal grandmother in Latvia as A’s long-term carer.’

WLR Daily, 6th May 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Family law at a distance – Speech by Lord Sumption

Family law at a distance (PDF)

Speech by Lord Sumption

At a Glance Conference 2016, Royal College of Surgeons, 8th June 2016

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

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Sumption: Legal specialisations are “essentially bogus” – Legal Futures

‘Legal specialisations are “essentially bogus”, Supreme Court judge Lord Sumption declared today as he urged practitioners to break out of their core areas and learn from other parts of the profession.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 8th June 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Preventing Child Sexual Exploitation: a lacuna in the law – Family Law Week

‘Matthew Warmoth, pupil barrister at Fourteen, finds that the court can do little to protect children from CSE when the exploiter is not a party to proceedings and there has been no police caution or conviction for a sexual or violent offence.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 4th May 2016

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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Mother who tried to move family to Syria ordered to give up children – The Guardian

Posted May 4th, 2016 in care orders, children, families, family courts, Islam, news, terrorism by tracey

‘The high court has ruled that the three children of a Leicester woman who tried to take them to Isis-controlled territory must live with their grandmother.’

Full story

The Guardian, 3rd May 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Part 25 Applications – The theory and the practice – Family Law Week

‘Marie Crawford, barrister, Becket Chambers considers the disconnection between theory and practice in making applications to adduce expert evidence.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 21st April 2016

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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The Brave New World of Electronic Filing at the Central Family Court – Family Law Week

‘Michael Allum, Solicitor with The International Family Law Group LLP, explains how the Central Family Court’s pilot scheme for electronic filing of documents will work.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 22nd April 2016

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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Judge allows paternity test for DNA disease analysis – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted April 22nd, 2016 in cancer, DNA, family courts, genetic testing, human tissue, news, paternity by tracey

‘Spencer v Anderson (Paternity Testing) [2016] EWHC 851 (Fam). A fascinating case in the Family Division throws up a number of facts that some may find surprising. One is that this is the first time the courts in this country have been asked to direct post-mortem scientific testing to establish paternity. The other is that DNA is not covered by the Human Tissue Act, because genetic material does not contain human cells. One might wonder why the statute doesn’t, given that DNA is the instruction manual that makes the human tissue that it covers – but maybe updating the 2004 law to cover genetic material would create more difficulties than it was designed to resolve.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 20th April 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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In re G (Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008) – WLR Daily

In re G (Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008) [2016] EWHC 729 (Fam)

‘The applicant, X, who was at all material times in a same-sex relationship with Y, was the biological mother of twins, born as a result of IVF treatment provided by a licensed fertility clinic to Y, the gestational mother and the twins’ legal parent. Y was at all material times in a civil partnership with, though separated from, another woman who was not a party to the proceedings. Y, as the gestational mother, should have signed Form WP, and X, as her partner, should have signed Form PP. In fact, and as a result of what was accepted to have been errors by the clinic, Y completed and signed a Form PP and X completed and signed a Form WP. A similar mistake was made in relation to the Form IC signed by both Y and X. X, supported by Y, sought a declaration pursuant to section 55A of the Family Law Act 1986 that she was, in accordance with section 43 of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008, the legal parent of the twins and in the circumstances it was common ground that X was entitled to the relief she sought. The issues were: (1) whether that was a conclusion that the court could come to simply by a process of construction or whether the proper form of order was a decree of rectification and (2) arising out of the fact that Y was at all material times in a civil partnership with another woman, the potential impact of section 42(1) of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008 which provided: “If at the time of the placing in her of the embryo or the sperm and eggs or of her artificial insemination, W was a party to a civil partnership or a marriage with another woman, then subject to section 45(2) to (4), the other party to the civil partnership or marriage is to be treated as a parent of the child unless it is shown that she did not consent to the placing in W of the embryo or the sperm and eggs or to her artificial insemination … ”’

WLR Daily, 6th April 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Health Executive of Ireland v Z and others – WLR Daily

Health Executive of Ireland v Z and others [2016] EWHC 784 (Fam)

‘The applicant sought and obtained an order in the Irish High Court authorising the treatment in a specialist unit in an English hospital of an Irish child aged 15 who had developed a very serious eating disorder and who required treatment which could not be provided in her home country. Her doctors, supported by her parents but against her wishes, made arrangements for her to be admitted and treated in a specialist unit in an English hospital which was able to provide the treatment required. The applicant applied to the English High Court for an order, under the inherent jurisdiction of the court, for recognition and enforcement of the Irish High Court order. At an initial hearing the court made an interim emergency order under inherent jurisdiction permitting the child’s emergency admission for treatment in the hospital in England. At a further hearing on notice a number of issues arose for determination, including whether article 1 of Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (“the Regulation”) applied to the case, whether the court had power under its inherent jurisdiction to make an interim emergency order for the recognition and enforcement of the Irish High Court order pending an application under FPR Pt 31, whether recognition should be refused on any of the grounds set out in article 23 of the Regulation, and whether the child should be represented in the proceedings.’

WLR Daily, 8th April 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Susskind: online court is just the beginning – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The proposed online court is a “pragmatic first step” on the road to a fully integrated online and conventional court service, an influential body has predicted. Professor Richard Susskind (pictured), who leads a panel of experts on digital dispute resolution, said proposals by Lord Justice Briggs for an online court for small claims were to be welcomed.’

Full story

Law Society’s Gazette, 9th April 2016

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Finance & Divorce Update, April 2016 – Family Law Week

‘Edward Heaton, Principal Associate and Jane Booth, Associate, both of Mills & Reeve LLP analyse the news and case law relating to financial remedies and divorce during March 2016.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 8th April 2016

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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Research suggests Family Drug and Alcohol Courts make major savings – Local Government Lawyer

Posted March 8th, 2016 in alcohol abuse, courts, drug abuse, family courts, news, reports by sally

‘Family Drug and Alcohol Courts (FDACs) save the state money, with the London FDAC alone generating estimated gross savings of £1.29m to public sector bodies over five years, research has suggested.’

Full story

Local Government Lawyer, 8th March 2016

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

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Finance and Divorce Update (March 2016) – Family Law Week

‘Edward Heaton, Principal Associate and Jane Booth, Associate, both of Mills & Reeve LLP analyse the news and case law relating to financial remedies and divorce during February 2016.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 5th March 2016

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

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In re JL and AO (Babies Relinquished for Adoption) – WLR Daily

In re JL and AO (Babies Relinquished for Adoption): [2016] EWHC 440 (Fam)

‘In two cases babies, JL and AO, were born in England to mothers from Eastern Europe but relinquished at birth for adoption. In the case of JL the child, whose Estonian mother worked in England and whose putative father lived in Estonia, was accommodated by the local authority with the mother’s consent pursuant to an agreement under section 20 of the Children Act 1989 and was placed with foster carers. The mother gave her written consent to his adoption and the putative father, maternal family and the Estonian authorities all supported his adoption in this country. The local authority sought a placement order under section 21 of the Adoption and Children Act 2002. In the case of AO, the Hungarian parents working in England wished the child to be adopted in this country. AO had been removed at birth and placed with foster carers and had been made a ward of court. The local authority, children’s guardian and Hungarian authorities sought the child’s return to Hungary so that she could be placed for adoption there. Common issues arose as to what jurisdiction the court had to make orders facilitating such placements, (ii) the factors which had to be taken into account when making decisions about relinquished babies, the possible outcomes and the procedures to be followed and (iii) where a child born to nationals of a foreign country had been placed voluntarily in the care of a local authority, with a view to adoption or otherwise, whether the authority was under an obligation under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations 1963 to inform the consular officials of that country about the placement. In the case of JL, the further issues arose whether the court had jurisdiction to make a placement order and what order, if any, should be made. In the case of AO, the further issues arose whether it was open to the court either to transfer jurisdiction to Hungary under Council Regulation (EC) No 2201/2003 (“Brussels IIA”) or to make an order permitting the local authority to send AO to Hungary; and what order, if any, the court should make.’

WLR Daily, 3rd March 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Speech by Sir James Munby to the Family Law Bar Association – Courts and Tribunals Judiciary

Posted March 4th, 2016 in barristers, divorce, electronic filing, family courts, speeches by tracey

‘Speech by Sir James Munby, President of the Family Division, 26 February 2016.’

Full speech

Courts and Tribunals Judiciary, 29th February 2016

Source: www.judiciary.gov.uk

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