NSPCC’s call for law change over sex messages – BBC News

Posted October 24th, 2014 in child abuse, electronic mail, internet, news, sexual offences, telecommunications by sally

‘Campaigners want it to be made illegal for adults to send sexual messages to children.’

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BBC News, 24th October 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Police ‘use loophole’ to access phone and email records – Daily Telegraph

‘Police forces have used a loophole to access phone and email records, it has been claimed.’

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Daily Telegraph, 20th October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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National Crime Agency director general: UK snooping powers are too weak – The Guardian

‘Britons must accept a greater loss of digital freedoms in return for greater safety from serious criminals and terrorists in the internet age, according to the country’s top law enforcement officer.’

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The Guardian, 7th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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EAT: employee who might be dismissed for gross misconduct may still be entitled to claim constructive dismissal – OUT-LAW.com

‘An employee is not prevented from resigning and bringing a constructive dismissal claim against a former employer by the fact that the employer may have been preparing a gross misconduct case against him, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 27th August 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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How to protect yourself from data breaches – The Future of Law

‘Barristers and solicitors need to make sure they keep personal information secure, especially information on paper files, says a statement from the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). This warning follows a number of data breaches reported to the ICO over the last few months involving the legal profession.’

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The Future of Law, 26th August 2014

Source: www.blogs.lexisnexis.co.uk

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News International lawyers face tribunal over alleged hacking coverup – The Guardian

‘Two lawyers working for News International at the height of the phone hacking scandal are being prosecuted by the legal profession’s regulator for allegedly seeking to cover up the scale of criminality at the News of the World.’

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The Guardian, 9th August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Information Commissioner sounds alarm over lawyers’ handling of personal data – Legal Futures

‘The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has issued a warning to solicitors and barristers over the need to keep personal information secure, especially paper files, in the wake of “a number of data breaches” in recent months.’

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Legal Futures, 6th August 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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DRIP – Data Retention Regulations come into force – Panopticon

‘The introduction of the controversial draft Data Retention Regulations 2014 has already been discussed by my colleague Robin Hopkins in his excellent post last month. The Regulations now have the force of law, having come into force on 31 July 2014 – see the Regulations here. In his post, Robin made the point that, following the judgment in Digital Rights Ireland, there were two methods for curtailing the infringement of privacy rights presupposed by the existing communications data retention (CDR) regime: either cut back on the data retention requirements provided for under the legislation, so as generally to limit the potential for interference with privacy rights, or introduce more robust safeguards with a view to ensuring that any interference with privacy rights is proportionate and otherwise justified. The Government, which has evidently opted for the latter approach in the new Regulations, will now need to persuade a somewhat sceptical public that the safeguards which have been adopted in the legislation strike the right balance as between the protection of privacy rights on the one hand and the imperative to support criminal law enforcement functions on the other.’

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Panopticon, 5th August 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Innes v Information Commissioner and another – WLR Daily

Innes v Information Commissioner and another [2014] EWCA 1086; [2014] WLR (D) 358

‘Under section 11(1) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 a claimant requesting information under section 1(1) of the 2000 Act was entitled to stipulate what software format should be used when the information sought was provided to him.’

WLR Daily, 31st July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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The death of privacy – The Guardian

‘Google knows what you’re looking for. Facebook knows what you like. Sharing is the norm, and secrecy is out. But what is the psychological and cultural fallout from the end of privacy?’

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The Guardian, 3rd August 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Section 11 FOIA and the Form of a Request – Panopticon

Posted August 1st, 2014 in electronic mail, freedom of information, news, school admissions by sally

‘In the usual end of term rush, the Court of Appeal has handed down judgment in Innes v Information Commissioner [2014] EWCA Civ 1086 on the provision in section 11 FOIA which allows a requestor to express a preference for communication by a particular means, so long as it is reasonably practicable to give effect to the preference. The issue in Innes was that Mr Innes had requested certain school admissions information and had sent a further email shortly afterwards asking for that information to be supplied to him in Excel format. The ICO, the FTT and the Upper Tribunal had all ruled against Mr Innes, in part relying on the Scottish decision of Glasgow City Council v Scottish Information Commissioner [2009] CSIH 73; [2010] SC 125.’

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Panopticon, 1st August 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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George Galloway’s ex-aide discharged over data breach – BBC News

‘A former aide to George Galloway MP who admitted obtaining personal data illegally has received a 12-month conditional discharge.’

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BBC News, 31st July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Watchdog ‘desperate’ for ministers to crack down on nuisance calls and spam texts – Daily Telegraph

Posted July 30th, 2014 in compensation, electronic mail, news, nuisance, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘Victims of spam message companies could find it easier to win compensation under plans backed by the Information Commissioner’s Office’

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Daily Telegraph, 29th July 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Tom Hickman: Further Concerns about the DRIP Bill – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In a blog post on Monday I expressed concerns about the lack of time for proper scrutiny of the changes to be brought in by the DRIP Bill. Towards the end of that blog I expressed puzzlement at a change to be made to the definition of “telecommunications system” in RIPA. This definition is central to the scheme of RIPA and is the basis for many of the powers therein.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 16th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

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Peers criticise government over emergency data laws – BBC News

Posted July 17th, 2014 in bills, electronic mail, interception, news, parliament, telecommunications by tracey

‘The government has come under fire in the Lords over emergency legislation giving the security services access to people’s phone and internet records.’

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BBC News, 16th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Emergency surveillance bill clears Commons – The Guardian

‘Controversial emergency surveillance legislation has cleared the Commons after an extended sitting and angry exchanges alleging an abuse of parliament.’

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The Guardian, 16th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Tom Hickman on the DRIP Bill: Plugging Gaps in Surveillance Laws or Authorising the Unlawful? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The unveiling last Thursday of a a draft bill on surveillance powers that is to be rushed through Parliament brought to mind the story of the Dutch boy who finds a hole in a dyke on his way to school and puts his finger in it to plug the leak until help arrives to shore it up. The legislation is said to be necessary to plug what the Government regards as holes in the regime of surveillance and investigatory powers pending a full review. The fact that the bill is titled the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill – the “DRIP” bill – may mean I am not the first person to draw the analogy. But the analogy may not be entirely apt. An examination of the DRIP Bill reveals that it is not addressing little holes in the regime but in fact profoundly important and substantial issues.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 14th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

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Emergency data retention law could fail same tests as the existing law – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 15th, 2014 in bills, EC law, electronic mail, news, telecommunications by tracey

‘FOCUS: The new law proposed by the UK government to ensure that telecoms companies keep communications data for a year could be challenged in the same way as the court-revoked law it is replacing.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 15th July 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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NSA surveillance data: UK access to information faces legal challenge – The Guardian

‘The biggest domestic legal challenge to UK intelligence agencies accessing the mass data harvested by the US National Security Agency (NSA) begins on Monday, and may be one reason behind the government’s decision to introduce emergency surveillance laws into parliament next week, campaigners have suggested.’

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The Guardian, 11th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Tribunal to hear legal challenge to GCHQ surveillance claims – BBC News

‘A tribunal is to hear a legal challenge by civil liberty groups against the alleged use of mass surveillance programmes by UK intelligence services.’

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BBC News, 14th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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