New UK rules finalised on the re-use of public sector information – OUT-LAW.com

‘Public bodies in the UK must make it easier for businesses to re-use the information they hold from the middle of next month, under new regulations that have been passed by parliament.’
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OUT-LAW.com, 30th June 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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New code of conduct on data protection for cloud service providers being scrutinised by EU privacy watchdogs – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 1st, 2015 in data protection, EC law, internet, news, regulations by sally

‘EU privacy watchdogs are assessing a proposed new code of conduct on data protection for cloud service providers that the European Commission hopes will help to boost the uptake of cloud services by EU businesses.’
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OUT-LAW.com, 30th June 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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GCHQ spied on two human rights bodies – Daily Telegraph

Posted June 23rd, 2015 in data protection, human rights, intelligence services, news, tribunals by tracey

‘GCHQ spied on two human rights organisations, it has emerged, and breached its own internal policies in how it handled the information.’

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Daily Telegraph, 22nd June 2015

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Britain Can Lead the World In Online Privacy – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted June 16th, 2015 in data protection, internet, investigatory powers, news, privacy, reports, terrorism by sally

‘British legal history has long inspired the common law world. The Magna Carta, an 800-year-old agreement between a King and his barons, remains an icon of liberty, seen around the world as the foundation stone of the rule of law. In contrast, British law on online surveillance and privacy has been arcane and obscure – a field that is for reluctant experts if it is for anyone at all.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 13th June 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Legal challenge against Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act reaches High Court – OUT-LAW.com

‘A legal challenge fronted by two UK MPs against communications surveillance laws passed last year has reached the High Court.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 4th June 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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Cost of data breach incidents to business soars, finds UK government study – OUT-LAW.com

Posted June 4th, 2015 in costs, data protection, news, reports by sally

‘The worst data breach incidents are costing UK businesses between £1.5 million and £3m on average through business disruption, lost sales and assets and damage to reputation, new research by the UK government and consultancy PwC has found.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 3rd June 2015

Source: www.out-law.com

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Regina (AB) v Chief Constable of Hampshire Constabulary – WLR Daily

Regina (AB) v Chief Constable of Hampshire Constabulary [2015] EWHC 1238 (Admin); [2015] WLR (D) 225

‘While the disclosure by police of non-conviction material to a third party involved an interference with a person’s right to respect for his private and family life, within the meaning of article 8 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, the common law empowered the police to disclose relevant information to relevant parties, where it was necessary for police purposes such as the public protection. Moreover, the Data Protection Act 1998 and the relevant statutory and administrative codes, provided a sufficiently clear, accessible and consistent set of rules, so as to prevent arbitrary or abusive interference with an individual’s article 8 rights; such that the disclosure would be in accordance with law.’

WLR Daily, 20th May 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Disclosing child protection information: make sure you ask the right questions first – Panopticon

Posted June 2nd, 2015 in child abuse, data protection, disclosure, news, privacy by sally

‘High-profile revelations in recent years illustrate the importance of public authorities sharing information on individuals who are of concern in relation to child protection matters. When inaccurate information is shared, however, the consequences for the individual can be calamitous.’

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Panopticon, 1st June 2015

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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The government’s data law – an attack on encryption? – BBC News

‘Overdue modernisation of the way the authorities monitor criminals and terrorists – or a Snooper’s Charter eroding our basic liberties? The proposal outlined in the Queen’s Speech to “modernise the law on communications data” will divide opinion. But prepare for another long battle over the way that law is framed and the balance it strikes between privacy and public safety.’

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BBC News, 27th May 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Queen’s Speech: New online data terror powers proposed – BBC News

‘Planned new laws to give police and spies stronger powers to “target the online communications” of terrorist suspects are in the Queen’s Speech.’

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BBC News, 27th May 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Police force fined £160k after losing DVDs of interview with abuse victim – Local Government Lawyer

Posted May 19th, 2015 in data protection, evidence, fines, news, police, video recordings by sally

‘The Information Commissioner’s Office has imposed a £160,000 monetary penalty on a police force after it lost DVDs of an interview which formed part of the evidence in a sexual abuse case.’

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Local Government Lawyer, 18th May 2015

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

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Mosley v Google: RIP – Panopticon

Posted May 19th, 2015 in data protection, EC law, human rights, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘So Max Mosley has done a deal with Google in respect of his claim that Google had breached his rights under the DPA 1998 by refusing to block certain images and videos accessible via the Google search engine (see this FT article which suggests that the settlement also applies to claims brought by Mr Mosley in Germany and France). The settlement of the claim, which follows on from Google’s failed strike out application (discussed further below), leaves unanswered a number of really important questions concerning the application of data protection rights in the online world. Not least, the settlement leaves open the question of the extent to which the so-called ‘right to be forgotten’ can operate so as to force internet search engines, not only to de-index individual URLs on request, but also to block access to the offending data globally (i.e. as ISEs already do, for example, where images of child pornography are identified).’

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Panopticon, 18th May 2015

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Information Commissioner’s Office to review privacy in children’s apps – The Guardian

Posted May 13th, 2015 in children, computer programs, data protection, news, privacy by tracey

‘Children’s apps and websites are in the spotlight on privacy grounds again, after the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) announced a review of how these services collect data on their young users.’

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The Guardian, 12th May 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Section 7(9) Again (What, Again?) – Panopticon

Posted May 7th, 2015 in damages, data protection, news by sally

‘On a day when the country goes to the polls (or, if you a UKIP supporter, to the Poles), it is nice to be able remind people of the more important things in life than mere democratic-right exercising. The chief of these is, surely, developments under the Data Protection Act 1998. Happily, Panopticon can assist, with a quick note on an ex tempore judgment of HHJ Seymour QC in Ittihadieh v 5-11 Cheyne Gardens RTM Co Ltd & 6 others (QBD, 5 May 2015). There is no transcript yet available, but a headnote is now reported on Lawtel, and this summary is taken from that.’

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Panopticon, 7th May 2015

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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PC Adam Rushton is jailed for sexual misconduct – BBC News

Posted May 5th, 2015 in data protection, news, police, professional conduct, sentencing by sally

‘A police officer who had sex with vulnerable women while on duty has been jailed for three years.’
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BBC News, 1st May 2015

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Freedom of information: round-up – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Transparency and openness for local authorities does not just mean disclosing information under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FoI). Section 3 of the Local Government, Planning and Land Act 1980 gives the secretary of state the power to issue a code of practice about the publication of information by local authorities relating to the discharge of their functions.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 13th April 2015

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Why we should see Andrew Lansley’s diary in the run up to 2011 NHS reforms – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Department of Health v. Information Commissioner et al [2015] UKUT 159, 30 March 2015, Charles J read judgment Simon Lewis requested that the Department of Health supply him with copies of the ministerial diary of Andrew Lansley from May 2010 until April 2011, via a Freedom of Information request. Mr Lewis’s interest in all this is not revealed in the judgment, but I dare say included seeing whether the Minister was being lobbied by private companies eager to muscle in on the NHS in this critical period. But such is the nature of FOIA litigation that it does not really look at the motive of the requester – and this case does not tell us what the diary showed. Indeed by the time of this appeal, Lewis was untraceable, and the burden of the argument in favour of disclosure was taken up by the Information Commissioner.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 10th April 2015

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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University admissions service broke data laws over targeted advertising – The Guardian

Posted April 9th, 2015 in advertising, data protection, news, privacy, universities, young persons by sally

‘The universities admissions service, Ucas, broke data protection rules when it signed up teenagers to receive adverts about mobile phones, energy drinks and other products, the information commissioner has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 8th April 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Vidal-Hall v Google Inc (Information Commissioner intervening) – WLR Daily

Vidal-Hall v Google Inc (Information Commissioner intervening) [2015] EWCA Civ 311; [2015] WLR (D) 156

‘A claim for misuse of private information should be categorised as a tort for the purposes of service of proceedings out of the jurisdiction.’

WLR Daily, 18th March 2015

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Facebook ‘tracks all visitors, breaching EU law’ – The Guardian

Posted April 1st, 2015 in computer programs, consent, data protection, EC law, internet, news, privacy by sally

‘Facebook tracks the web browsing of everyone who visits a page on its site even if the user does not have an account or has explicitly opted out of tracking in the EU, extensive research commissioned by the Belgian data protection agency has revealed.’

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The Guardian, 31st March 2015

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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