Are universities breaking consumer protection laws? – The Guardian

Posted April 22nd, 2014 in competition, consumer protection, education, inquiries, news, universities by sally

‘Institutions making last-minute changes to courses have prompted an inquiry by the competition authorities.’

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The Guardian, 22nd April 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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‘Culture change’ needed to embrace fee-charging McKenzie friends – Law Society’s Gazette

‘Fee-charging McKenzie friends increase access to justice and make up a “legitimate feature of the modern legal market”, according to a report published today by watchdog the Legal Services Consumer Panel. The president of the Law Society described the panel’s findings as “worrying”.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 17th April 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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4finance UAB v Valstybinė vartotojų teisių apsaugos tarnyba and another – WLR Daily

4finance UAB v Valstybinė vartotojų teisių apsaugos tarnyba and another (Case C-515/12); [2014] WLR (D) 156

‘Annex I, point 14, of Parliament and Council Directive 2005/29/EC meant that a pyramid promotional scheme constituted an unfair commercial practice only where such a scheme required the consumer to give financial consideration, regardless of its amount, for the opportunity to receive compensation that was derived primarily from the introduction of other consumers into the scheme rather than from the sale or consumption of products.’

WLR Daily, 3rd April 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Supreme Court hands down judgment in Durkin v DSG Retail Limited and another – Henderson Chambers

‘On 26 March 2014 the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Durkin v DSG Retail Limited and another. The judgment in this long-running case addresses the issue of a consumer’s right, in the context of a debtor-creditor-supplier agreement, to rescind the credit agreement on lawful rescission of the sale agreement.’

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Henderson Chambers, 28th March 2014

Source: www.hendersonchambers.co.uk

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Durkin (Appellant) v DSG Retail Ltd and another (Respondents) (Scotland) – Supreme Court

Durkin (Appellant) v DSG Retail Ltd and another (Respondents) (Scotland) [2014] UKSC 21 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 26th March 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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Duped by the ‘blood analyst’ who says he can cure cancer – Daily Telegraph

Posted March 31st, 2014 in advertising, cancer, consumer protection, doctors, news by sally

‘Controversial Harley Street specialist is found guilty of claiming he can cure cancer in landmark case brought by trading standards.’

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Daily Telegraph, 30th March 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Ofgem asks competition watchdog to investigate big six energy suppliers – The Guardian

Posted March 27th, 2014 in competition, consumer protection, energy, news by tracey

‘The energy regulator has asked the competition watchdog to investigate Britain’s energy companies in an effort to restore trust in the industry after public uproar over rising fuel bills.’

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The Guardian, 27th March 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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OFT: ‘significant gaps’ in university prospectuses – Daily Telegraph

Posted March 14th, 2014 in advertising, consumer protection, fees, news, universities by tracey

‘The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) warns that universities are failing to supply students with enough information before they apply, but finds no evidence of ‘fee fixing’ between institutions.’

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Daily Telegraph, 14th March 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Quarter of payday lenders may quit under tougher rules – BBC News

‘One quarter of payday lenders may pull out of the market under pressure from new regulations. The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is to investigate the way they treat borrowers struggling to repay loans. It has said the review will be one of its first actions when it takes over regulation of the consumer credit sector on 1 April.’

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BBC News. 12th March 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Most train users unaware of rights, says rail regulator – BBC News

Posted February 21st, 2014 in codes of practice, compensation, consumer protection, news, railways by sally

‘Most train passengers are unaware of their rights to compensation after cancellations or delays, the rail regulator has said.’

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BBC News, 21st February 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Insolvency practitioners to be prevented from charging by the hour under new proposals – OUT-LAW.com

‘Administrators and other insolvency practitioners (IPs) could be prevented from charging an hourly rate for their services and could instead have to base their fees on a percentage of property dealt with under plans put forward for consultation by the Government.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 19th February 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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OFT warns universities about sanctions on students in debt – The Guardian

Posted February 19th, 2014 in consumer protection, debts, disciplinary procedures, news, ombudsmen, universities by sally

‘The Office of Fair Trading has written to more than 170 universities and other higher education groups warning that the widespread practice of stopping students graduating or continuing with their course if they owe money over issues such as late library books or childcare services could breach consumer laws.’

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The Guardian, 18th February 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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“Unfair advantage” under the Trade Marks Directive – Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers

Posted February 7th, 2014 in consumer protection, news, trade marks by tracey

‘Readers over the age of 24 do not fall into Jack Wills’ core target market, and may therefore be unfamiliar with the clothing brand’s “Mr Wills” pheasant logo. On the other hand, those readers who are Jack Wills devotees may want to check when you get home that you have not got confused and accidentally purchased, for about the same price, a House of Fraser product adorned with this equally delightful but nonetheless different bird. If you did get confused, it is perfectly understandable. After all, they’re both silhouettes of birds “equipped with accessories associated with an English gentleman”, as Mr Justice Arnold explained last week in Jack Wills Ltd v House of Fraser (Stores) Ltd [2014] EWHC 110 (Ch).’

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Competition Bulletin from Blackstone Chambers, 4th February 2014

Source: www.competitionbulletin.com

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Two-month deadline over in-app charges – BBC News

Posted January 30th, 2014 in computer programs, consumer protection, news, telecommunications by sally

‘Creators of mobile apps that promote in-app purchases are being given two months to comply with Office of Fair Trading guidelines’

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BBC News, 30th January 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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16-year laptop credit agreement fight reaches supreme court – The Guardian

‘A man embroiled in a mammoth 16-year legal battle over a laptop found himself in the “absurd and horrid” position of having to keep paying for an item he had already returned to the shop, the supreme court has been told.’

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The Guardian, 28th January 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Ofgem accuses Npower of ‘misleading’ report – BBC News

Posted January 22nd, 2014 in consumer protection, energy, news, reports by sally

‘A report by power supplier Npower, claiming bills will rise due to higher energy distribution costs, has been dismissed by regulator Ofgem as “misleading”.’

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BBC News, 22nd January 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Patients will be identifiable when firms are given access to confidential NHS data, experts warn – The Independent

Posted January 20th, 2014 in consumer protection, data protection, hospitals, medical records, news, privacy by sally

‘Privacy experts have warned that commercial firms will be able to identify people when they are given access to confidential NHS patient data.’

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The Independent, 20th January 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Payday lenders’ default fees could break the law – The Independent

Posted January 13th, 2014 in consumer protection, debts, fees, loans, news by tracey

‘Many payday lenders could be breaking the law by charging excessive default fees to borrowers who miss repayments, according to Which? An investigation by the consumer group revealed that 10 of 17 leading payday lenders have default fees of £20 or more, and four charged £25 and above, with Wonga topping the table at £30.’

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The Independent, 13th January 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Illegal tobacco seller Roger Gerrey sold cigarettes to children – BBC News

‘A man who turned his Devon home into a shop selling illegal cigarettes to school children has been spared a jail sentence.’

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BBC News, 9th January 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Copyright Licensing BBC v EOS – NIPC Law

‘As everyone knows, copyright restricts the acts listed in s.16 (1) of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (“CDPA”) in relation to a work in which copyright subsists (“a copyright work”). Those acts include copying, issuing copies, renting, lending or communicating the work to the public etc. Anyone who does any of those acts without the owner’s licence infringes that copyright. He or she may be sued or in an extreme case prosecuted.’

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NIPC Law, 17th December 2013

Source: www.nipclaw.blogspot.co.uk

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