Mau Mau rebellion victims claim parliament was misled over torture – The Guardian

Posted May 24th, 2016 in colonies, compensation, Kenya, news, parliament, torture, victims by sally

‘The UK’s parliament was misled over the brutal tactics used to suppress the 1950s Mau Mau rebellion in Kenya, the high court has heard.’

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The Guardian, 23rd May 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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If you’re going to go down a steep slope, make sure you do it on your bottom! – Zenith PI Blog

‘In a decision handed down last week in English Heritage v Taylor [2016] EWCA Civ 448 the Court of Appeal upheld a first instance decision of a finding of breach of duty under section 2 of the Occupier’s Liability Act 1957 and a finding of 50% contributory negligence against the claimant. The issues centred around what was an obvious danger.’

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Zenith PI Blog, 20th May 2016

Source: www.zenithpi.wordpress.com

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Bereavement damages: Unmarried Chorley woman’s legal fight – BBC News

‘A woman is taking the government to court for breaching her human rights in denying her bereavement damages after her partner died.’

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BBC News, 22nd May 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Mau Mau lawsuit due to begin at high court – The Guardian

‘Compensation claims for torture, rape, wrongful detention and forced labour brought by 40,000 Kenyans who allege they were mistreated by British officials during the Mau Mau insurgency are due to be heard in the high court in London on Monday.’

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The Guardian, 22nd May 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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NHSLA ordered to pay indemnity costs for surveillance video “ambush” – Litigation Futures

‘The NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) has been ordered by the High Court to pay indemnity costs after sending a last-minute surveillance video to the claimant’s lawyers which resulted in a trial being vacated.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th May 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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PPI victims ‘should have got £5bn more’ – BBC News

Posted May 13th, 2016 in compensation, consumer protection, insurance, news by tracey

‘Twelve million consumers who were mis-sold Payment Protection Insurance (PPI) should have got an extra £5bn, a group of MPs has said. That is the total amount that claims management companies charged clients to process their complaints.
MPs on the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) said they were disappointed the money did not go to the victims of the scandal.’

Full story

BBC News, 13th May 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Court rejects 600 Iraqis’ claims of mistreatment by UK soldiers – The Guardian

Posted May 12th, 2016 in appeals, armed forces, compensation, Iraq, news, Supreme Court, time limits by sally

‘Claims by more than 600 Iraqi civilians alleging that they were unlawfully detained and physically mistreated by British soldiers have been dismissed by the supreme court in London.’

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The Guardian, 12th May 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Construction firms apologise in court over blacklist – The Guardian

Posted May 12th, 2016 in compensation, construction industry, damages, employment, news, trade unions by sally

‘Leading construction firms have formally apologised to hundreds of trade unionists for putting them on an illegal blacklist and denying them work.’

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The Guardian, 11th May 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Farmer awarded £1m noise compensation from Stansted airport still waiting for pay-out 17 years later… as white lines haven’t been finished – Daily Telegraph

Posted May 11th, 2016 in airports, compensation, housing, news, noise by sally

‘A farm owner who won £1 million from Stansted because planes flying over his £2 million home slashed its value in half is still waiting for the pay-out 17 years later.’

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Daily Telegraph, 10th May 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Blacklisted workers win £10m payout from construction firms – The Guardian

‘About £10m will be paid in compensation to more than 250 building workers who were “blacklisted” by some of Britain’s biggest construction firms under a settlement to be announced on Monday.’

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The Guardian, 9th May 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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High Court: no “windfall” in allowing barrister to claim fast-track trial advocacy fee – Litigation Futures

‘Allowing a claimant’s barrister to recover a trial advocacy fee in a fast-track personal injury case, settled on the morning of the hearing, “hardly amounts to a windfall”, a High Court judge has said.’

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Litigation Futures, 3rd May 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Compensation for health and safety breaches depends on actual harm, Court of Appeal confirms – OUT-LAW.com

‘Employees must be able to prove that they have suffered actual harm as a result of breaches of health and safety law by an employer in order to claim compensation, the Court of Appeal has confirmed.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 29th April 2016

Source: www.out-law.com

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To notify or not to notify: the impact of contact terms on common law rights to terminate – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted April 27th, 2016 in compensation, construction industry, contracts, damages, news, notification by sally

‘In Vinergy International (PVT) Ltd v Richmond Mercantile Ltd FZC [2016] EWHC 525 (Comm), Teare J held that the notice requirements contained in the termination provisions of a master supply agreement (the MSA) did not apply to an innocent party’s exercise of its common law right to terminate the agreement by accepting the other party’s repudiatory breach.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 26th April 2016

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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Regina (Sino) v Secretary of State for the Home Department – WLR Daily

Regina (Sino) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2016] EWHC 803 (Admin)

‘Claiming that he had been unlawfully detained, the claimant sought, through the route of judicial review, immediate release from detention, determination of the defendant’s liability for his false imprisonment and resolution as to whether, if false imprisonment was established, damages should be compensatory or nominal. The defendant had detained the claimant under immigration powers for periods totalling seven years and two months. The judge held that the claimant had been unlawfully detained between 13 July and 10 December 2013 and was entitled to more than nominal damages for false imprisonment, to be assessed on a compensatory basis. The claimant failed in his public law claim in relation to accommodation, deportation and removal. An issue arose as to costs. The defendant contended, inter alia, that as the claimant had succeeded on only one issue out of four he was entitled to only 25% of his costs.’

WLR Daily, 12th April 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Claim against MIB does not have protection of QOCS, High Court rules – Litigation Futures

‘A claim against the Motor Insurance Bureau (MIB) by the victim of an accident in France does not have the protection of qualified one-way costs shifting (QOCS), the High Court has ruled.

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Litigation Futures, 26th April 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Regina (Hallam) v Secretary of State for Justice; Regina (Nealon) v Same – WLR Daily

Posted April 20th, 2016 in compensation, judicial review, law reports, miscarriage of justice by sally

Regina (Hallam) v Secretary of State for Justice; Regina (Nealon) v Same [2016] EWCA Civ 355

‘Both claimants were convicted of serious criminal offences and had their initial appeals against conviction dismissed. In the first case the Criminal Cases Review Commission referred the claimant’s conviction for murder to the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division), which quashed it on the basis the safety of the conviction was undermined by the unsatisfactory nature of identification evidence and doubts as to whether the claimant’s alibi had been falsely made. In the second case the commission referred the claimant’s conviction for attempted rape to the Court of Appeal, which quashed it on the basis that the weakness of identification evidence and fresh DNA evidence taken from the victim’s clothing had had a substantial effect on the safety of the conviction. In both cases the Secretary of State refused the claimant compensation, under section 133 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988, as amended, on the basis that he had failed to show beyond reasonable doubt that the claimant had not committed the offence. The claimants’ claims for judicial review of the Secretary of State’s decisions, on the grounds that section 133(1ZA) of the 1988 Act (inserted by section 175 of the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 and providing that there has been a miscarriage of justice in relation to a person convicted of a criminal offence “if and only if the new or newly discovered fact shows beyond reasonable doubt that the person did not commit the offence”) was incompatible with article 6.2 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms in that it infringed the presumption of innocence, were dismissed by the Divisional Court of the Queen’s Bench Division which held that (i) the court was bound by authority of the Supreme Court (and also of the Court of Appeal) to hold that article 6.2 of the Convention was not applicable to compensation decisions made under section 133 of the 1988 Act; and (ii) the statutory scheme under section 133 maintained the presumption of innocence, did not require the applicant for compensation to prove his innocence and that only if the Secretary of State was satisfied that the new fact conclusively showed his innocence was compensation to be paid. The court also refused the claimant in the second case permission to proceed with a claim for judicial review on the basis that the Secretary of State was obliged to carry out a full review of the material before him in a particular case to determine whether the claimant was innocent.’

WLR Daily, 11th April 2016

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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The criminal review system is failing innocent prisoners – The Guardian

‘The Criminal Cases Review Commission was supposed to provide a safety net for those wrongly convicted, but it hasn’t shone a light on miscarriages of justice.’

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The Guardian, 19th April 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Payments to wrongly held detainees top £4m each year – BBC News

Posted April 20th, 2016 in compensation, detention, freedom of information, immigration, news by sally

‘The government is paying more than £4m each year in compensation to people who were held unlawfully in immigration detention centres, figures show.’

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BBC News, 20th April 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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PI victim gets 100% costs – despite failing with one allegation – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The Court of Appeal has ruled that a claimant should be awarded full costs of bringing her case despite losing on one of the issues.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 15th April 2015

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Court of Appeal overturns issues-based part 36 offer – Litigation Futures

‘Judges can make issues-based costs orders under part 36 but only if it is unjust to deprive a successful claimant of all or part of their costs, the Court of Appeal has ruled in overturning such an order.’

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Litigation Futures, 15th April 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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