British law student convicted of possessing bomb-making manual – The Guardian

Posted November 17th, 2014 in closed material, explosives, news, reporting restrictions, retrials, terrorism by sally

‘A man accused of plotting terrorist attacks in London has been convicted of possession of a bomb-making manual.’

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The Guardian, 17th November 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Lord chief justice attacks secret trials – BBC News

‘The lord chief justice of England and Wales has condemned an attempt to hold a completely secret trial, saying it should never happen again.’

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BBC News, 12th November 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Angela Patrick: Suing the state: judicial competence, restraint and redress in Belhadj – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The coverage of last week’s Court of Appeal’s decision in Belhadj & Or. v Straw & Ors [2014] EWCA Civ 1394 has thus far generated more political heat than legal light. When a claim involves the suit of named officials and former Ministers for their alleged role in the rendition of a major political figure in the new Libya and his family to face torture under the Gaddafi regime, this is perhaps understandable. In a week where the Government – in the context of this claim – has conceded that it must disclose certain of its policies on surveillance and legal professional privilege, it is unsurprising that the press has had little time to digest the detail of this judgment.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 7th November 2014

Source: http://ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog/

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Regina (B and others) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court and others – WLR Daily

Posted November 7th, 2014 in closed material, disclosure, evidence, extradition, law reports, magistrates by tracey

Regina (B and others) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court and others: [2014] UKSC 59; [2014] WLR (D) 470

‘A judge hearing extradition proceedings in the magistrates’ court had no power under the Extradition Act 2003 to hear evidence in a closed court and to make an order prohibiting the disclosure to the government of the requesting state of evidence adduced by individuals whose extradition was being sought. Extradition proceedings were not in a special category which would justify a departure from the principle of open justice.’

WLR Daily, 5th November 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Letting in a chink of light to closed material cases : Bank Mellat again – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted November 6th, 2014 in banking, closed material, disclosure, human rights, news, setting aside by sally

‘Fireworks here from Collins J in making sure that Bank Mellat got some disclosure of information in its fight to discharge a financial restriction order against it.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 5th November 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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VB (Appellant) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Respondent); EN (Appellant) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Respondent); CM (Appellant) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Respondent); CU (Appellant) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Respondent) – Supreme Court

VB (Appellant) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Respondent); EN (Appellant) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Respondent); CM (Appellant) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Respondent); CU (Appellant) v Westminster Magistrates’ Court (Respondent) [2014] UKSC 59 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 5th November 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

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Secret trial: Erol Incedal claims he was plotting robbery not terror attack – Daily Telegraph

‘The law student denies terrorism offences, saying he had contemplated committing an armed robbery or buying heroin or a gun instead’

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Daily Telegraph, 31st October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Government not required to disclose full details of defence – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The High Court has ruled that in a case against the state which did not directly affect the liberty of the subject, there was no irreducible minimum of disclosure of the state’s case which the court would require. The consequences of such disclosure for national security prevailed.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 27th October 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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‘Secret’ terror trial begins at Old Bailey – BBC News

Posted October 14th, 2014 in closed material, news, private hearings, reporting restrictions, terrorism, trials by sally

‘A jury has been sworn in at the Old Bailey for a terror trial that will be partially held in secret.’

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BBC News, 13th October 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Lord Neuberger on the Supreme Court: Five key cases from its first five years – The Independent

‘From euthanasia to high-speed rail, the highest in the land has an almost limitless remit.’

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The Independent, 12th October 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Secret trial defendant pleads guilty to possessing terrorist document – The Guardian

Posted October 10th, 2014 in closed material, documents, guilty pleas, news, reporting restrictions, terrorism by sally

‘One of the defendants due to face charges in a partly secret trial has pleaded guilty to possessing a terrorist document.’

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The Guardian, 9th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Legal Aid Challenge Success, Assisted Suicide and the Future of UK Human Rights – the Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

‘This week, the Conservative Party will unveil its plans for human rights reform in the UK. In other news, Chris Grayling’s decision to drastically reduce the number of legal aid contacts granted is successfully challenged, while a prosecution for assisted suicide keeps the assisted dying debate alive.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 28th September 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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The rise of the secret trial: Closed Material Procedures one year on – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Last week Justice Secretary Chris Grayling reported on how often closed material proceedings (CMPs) have been sought under the Justice and Security Act 2013 (JSA), as he is required to do annually under the Act. As the first and only official consolidated presentation of how the new CMP regime is being used, this two-page written ministerial statement warrants close attention.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 5th August 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Evidence during FOI disputes can be provided in secret, rules Court of Appeal – OUT-LAW.com

‘Public bodies defending a decision to withhold information requested under freedom of information (FOI) laws can submit evidence to an information rights tribunal in secret, the Court of Appeal has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 4th August 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Open justice and freedom of information – Court of Appeal judgment in Browning – Panopticon

Posted August 1st, 2014 in closed material, evidence, freedom of information, news, tribunals by sally

‘Last month I penned a post on the issue of how the principle of natural justice can be reconciled with the use of closed procedures in FOIA appeals. The post was written against the backdrop of the Court of Appeal hearing of the appeal in the Browning case. Today the Court of Appeal has handed down its judgment. Mr Browning’s appeal was dismissed.’

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Panopticon, 30th July 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Browning v Information Commissioner and Another – WLR Daily

Browning v Information Commissioner and Another [2014] EWCA Civ 1050;  [2014] WLR (D) 346

‘The First-tier Tribunal (General Regulatory Chamber) Rules 2009 permitted the tribunal when hearing an appeal against a decision of the Information Commissioner to adopt a closed material procedure in which a party and his legal representatives were excluded from the hearing or part of it.’

WLR Daily, 30th July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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How many times did court doors close? – BBC News

Posted July 23rd, 2014 in closed material, news, private hearings, statistics by michael

‘One for spy thriller fans and conspiracy theorists: in the last year, the government has asked judges five times to let it give secret evidence to defend itself in otherwise open court cases.’

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BBC News, 22nd July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Selected journalists to attend secret terror trial – the end of press freedom? – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted June 20th, 2014 in closed material, news, private hearings, reporting restrictions, terrorism by tracey

‘The application to have an entire trial held in secret caused a bit of a stir when news of the application was released earlier this month. The Court of Appeal has now permitted some of the hearing to be heard in public. This will probably be limited to the formalities at the start and end of the trial and parts of the Prosecution Opening.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 17th June 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Secret trials – a threat to justice? – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted June 20th, 2014 in closed material, news, private hearings, reporting restrictions, terrorism by tracey

‘Not since the long gone days of the Star Chamber has a case happened in secret with no reporting of the names of defendants, the charges, or the evidence. Whilst some element of secrecy is common place (see any trial with a youth or a sexual offence in the Crown Court for example) the idea that someone could be arrested, charged and potentially imprisoned without anyone beyond the immediate players knowing about it was anathema to the English lawyer.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 16th June 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Open justice and freedom of information – Browning in the Court of Appeal – Panopticon

‘The issue of just how open our justice system should be is an issue which is or should be of fundamental concern to all practising lawyers. If, as Jeremy Bentham once stated ‘publicity is the very soul of justice’ (cited by Lord Shaw in the leading case of Scott v Scott [1913] AC 477), then an open justice system is the corporeal expression of that soul. However, we now live in times where open justice is increasingly under threat. Indeed, as last week’s headlines reminded us all, matters have now got to a stage where some judges at least have been prepared to allow, not merely the deployment of a limited closed procedure to deal with certain aspects of a case, but a completely secret trial. It no doubt came as a relief to many that the Court of Appeal was not prepared to sanction such a comprehensive departure from the open justice principle: Guardian News v AB CD. However, the mere fact that the judiciary was prepared to contemplate such a procedure shows how far we have come since the days of Scott v Scott.’

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Panopticon, 18th June 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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