Solicitors will close if fee cuts not delayed, warns Law Society chief – The Guardian

Posted July 21st, 2014 in budgets, criminal justice, fees, law firms, legal aid, news by sally

‘Hundreds of solicitors’ firms will close if the Ministry of Justice does not postpone fee cuts and delay changes to criminal legal aid contracts, the new president of the Law Society has warned.’

Full story

The Guardian, 21st July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Bar Council reveals preliminary findings of its impact of LASPO survey – The Bar Council

‘The Bar Council, which represents barristers in England and Wales, has today presented its preliminary findings from a major survey conducted to assess the impact of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (LASPO) 2012.’

Full story

The Bar Council, 12th July 2014

Source: www.barcouncil.org.uk

Comments Off

Parole system preparing for overload as Supreme Court ruling gives prisoners right to ‘hopeless’ hearings – The Independent

Posted July 14th, 2014 in budgets, news, oral hearings, parole, statistics, Supreme Court by sally

‘The parole system is preparing for overload after a ruling gave prisoners the right to have hearings even when there is no hope of release.’

Full story

The Independent, 12th July 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Comments Off

New judicial review test “risks undermining rule of law”, peers warn – Litigation Futures

Posted July 7th, 2014 in bills, budgets, costs, judges, judicial review, legal aid, news, rule of law by sally

‘The government’s plan to introduce a stricter test on judicial review outcomes “risks undermining the rule of law”, the House of Lords constitution committee has warned.’

Full story

Litigation Futures, 7th July 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Comments Off

Court of Appeal takes some of the blame for “misunderstood and misapplied” Mitchell ruling – Litigation Futures

‘The Mitchell ruling has been “misunderstood and is being misapplied by some courts”, the Master of the Rolls said today in issuing more detailed guidance on how it should be used – while also recognising that some of the language used in Mitchell may have contributed to the problems.’

Full story

Litigation Futures, 4th July 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Comments Off

Court of Appeal sets out 3-stage test for applications for relief from sanctions – Local Government Lawyer

‘The Court of Appeal’s ruling today [4 July] in three linked appeals relating to its its earlier judgment in Mitchell will make civil litigation less adversarial and more co-operative, the Law Society has predicted.’

Full story

Local Government Lawyer, 4th July 2014

Source: www.localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk

Comments Off

Mitchell-Game, Set and Match? – NearlyLegal

‘The eagerly awaited Court of Appeal judgement in Denton & others v TH White Ltd & others was handed down on Friday. Dyson LJ provides a careful methodology on the approach to applications for relief from sanctions under CPR 3.9, with the aim to set to rights the fall-out from the landmark decision of Mitchell v News Group Newspapers Ltd’

Full story

NearlyLegal, 6th July 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

Comments Off

The Special Educational Needs (Personal Budgets) Regulations 2014 – Education Law Blog

‘These regulations will come into force on 1 September 2014. They basically extend the current pilot scheme for personal budgets to all local authorities and apply it to the new Education Health and Care Plans regime. I posted back in 2012 about the pilot scheme and these new regulations make very few changes to the substance of that scheme.’

Full story

Education Law Blog, 28th June 2014

Source: www.education11kbw.com

Comments Off

Property mediation in the post-Jackson and the Mitchell world – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted June 26th, 2014 in arbitration, budgets, civil procedure rules, costs, news by sally

‘It has been clear for a while that both politicians and many members of the judiciary have left behind their initial scepticism and now become fervent supporters of formal alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes, mediation in particular.’

Full story

Hardwicke Chambers, 13th June 2014

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

Comments Off

Americhem Europe Ltd v Rakem Ltd (George Walker Transport Ltd, Part 20 defendant) – WLR Daily

Americhem Europe Ltd v Rakem Ltd (George Walker Transport Ltd, Part 20 defendant) [2014] EWHC 1881 (TCC); [2014] WLR (D) 270

‘A costs draftsman whose only involvement in a case consisted of preparing a costs budget and who did not give any form of legal advice or legally based representation was not a “senior legal representative” for the purposes of paragraph 6 of Practice Direction 3E on Costs Management.’

WLR Daily, 13th June 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

Comments Off

Thousands of mothers have multiple babies removed – BBC News

‘Thousands of mothers over the past seven years have had successive children removed by family courts in England, the BBC has learned.’

Full story

BBC News, 23rd June 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off

Will Court of Appeal triple-header lead to ‘Mitchell-lite’? – Litigation Futures

Posted June 20th, 2014 in appeals, budgets, case management, civil procedure rules, costs, news by tracey

‘A barrister who has led the way in analysing the impact of the Mitchell case has predicted that this week’s hearing of three “trivial breach” cases at the Court of Appeal could pave the way for “Mitchell-lite”.’

Full story

Litigation Futures, 19th June 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Comments Off

Watchdog attacks the government’s handling ‘fiasco’ of disability payouts – The Guardian

Posted June 20th, 2014 in benefits, budgets, contracting out, disabled persons, news by tracey

‘The government’s handling of personal independence payments (Pips) has been “nothing short of a fiasco” that has caused distress to thousands of sick and disabled people, parliament’s public spending watchdog has found.’

Full story

The Guardian, 20th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Precedent H “irregularity” does not render it a nullity, High Court rules – Litigation Futures

‘It would be disproportionate and unjust to strike down a Precedent H budget that was signed by a firm’s in-house costs draftsman, rather than by a “senior legal representative”, the High Court has ruled.’

Full story

Litigation Futures, 16th June 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Comments Off

Prisons face overcrowding due to policy failure, says watchdog – The Guardian

Posted June 16th, 2014 in budgets, news, ombudsmen, prisons, sexual offences, standards, statistics, suicide by sally

‘The public is being put at risk by a “political and policy failure” in jails which risks boiling over this summer, the prisons’ inspectorate has warned as the government admitted more inmates would have to share cells to cope with an unexpected rise in numbers.’

Full story

The Guardian, 14th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Court crisis warning as legal aid cuts trigger surge in parents fighting for child custody without lawyer – Daily Telegraph

‘Lawyers warn of ‘huge delays’ in family court cases as number of parents facing prospect of representing themselves jumps 48 per cent’

Full story

Daily Telegraph, 7th June 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Comments Off

Disabled applicant not entitled under Article 8 to specific care needs – UK Human Rights Blog

‘The Strasbourg Court has ruled that local authorities are within their margin of discretion to balance individuals’ personal interests against the more general interest of the competent public authority in carrying out their social responsibility of provision of care to the community at large.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 7th June 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Comments Off

The Jackson Reforms: One year on – Falcon Chambers

‘The anniversary of the implementation of the Jackson reforms looms. Has all the fear and dread it engendered at the time been justified? Views will vary, whether because of temperament or because of preference, but in our view, for what it’s worth, the answer is “yes”. In the sphere of relief from sanctions at least, and in the kind of costs budgeting that we most often face, many of the concerns warned of in advance have come to pass. The by now well-know case of Andrew Mitchell has illustrated the draconian approach being taken by the courts to relief from sanctions, with the support of what appears to be a hand-picked Court of Appeal. The methodology of county courts in dealing with costs budgeting and CCMCs varies widely, making it difficult to predict or advise on procedural issues in the run up to trials and hearings.’

Full story (PDF)

Falcon Chambers, 25th March 2014

Source: www.falcon-chambers.com

Comments Off

The implications for bankrupts of the recent Budget announcement on pensions: have we gone full circle? – 11 Stone Buildings

Posted June 5th, 2014 in bankruptcy, budgets, news, pensions by sally

‘There has long been a tension between two competing public interests: encouraging individuals to save and provide for their financial security in old age on the one hand and providing recourse for creditors in the event of debtors being unable to pay their debts on the other. Historically, the legislative trend has generally been in favour of the creditor. The Welfare Reform and Pensions Act 1999 (“WRPA 99”), which came into force on 29 May 2000, appeared to provide fundamental changes to the relationship between these two competing policies. In 2012, however, when these reforms came before the court in Raithatha v Williamson the result indicated that WRPA 99 may have been far less significant than was previously supposed. If Williamson was correctly decided, then the changes to pension law introduced in the March 2014 Budget will have effectively unravelled those reforms altogether. Alaric Watson explains.’

Full story

11 Stone Buildings, May 2014

Source: www.11sb.com

Comments Off

Appeal court set for triple Mitchell showdown – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted June 4th, 2014 in appeals, budgets, case management, civil procedure rules, costs, delay, news by tracey

‘Master of the rolls Lord Dyson is to hear three consecutive appeals over two days in an effort to clarify the post-Mitchell landscape on compliance with case management rules.’

Full story

Law Society’s Gazette, 3rd June 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Comments Off