Data Retention & Investigatory Powers Bill receives Royal Assent – Home Office

‘Legislation to ensure UK law enforcement and intelligence agencies continue to have access to the vital evidence and information they need to investigate criminal activity, prevent terrorism and protect the public has today (Thursday 17 July) received Royal Assent.’

Full press release

Home Office, 17th July 2014

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

Comments Off

A bill to abolish chancel repair liability has been successfully introduced into the House of Lords – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted July 18th, 2014 in bills, Church of England, ecclesiastical law, parliament, repairs by tracey

‘The proposed legislation seeks to ‘end the liability of lay rectors for the repair of chancels’ – in other words abolishing the demands for landowners to fund repairs to their parish church.’

Full story

Law Society’s Gazette, 17th July 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

Comments Off

Tory Human Rights Plans, Child Abuse Inquiry and the Burqa Ban – the Human Rights Roundup – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted July 17th, 2014 in bills, freedom of expression, human rights, inquiries, judges, news by tracey

‘This week, the role of Lady Butler-Sloss in the forthcoming inquiry into child abuse is challenged, while the government pushes for emergency legislation to monitor phone and internet records. Meanwhile, the European Court of Human Right upholds France’s niqab ban and the Tories get closer to announcing their plans for human rights reform.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 17th July 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Comments Off

Tom Hickman: Further Concerns about the DRIP Bill – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘In a blog post on Monday I expressed concerns about the lack of time for proper scrutiny of the changes to be brought in by the DRIP Bill. Towards the end of that blog I expressed puzzlement at a change to be made to the definition of “telecommunications system” in RIPA. This definition is central to the scheme of RIPA and is the basis for many of the powers therein.’

Full story

UK Constitutional Law Association, 16th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

Comments Off

Peers criticise government over emergency data laws – BBC News

Posted July 17th, 2014 in bills, electronic mail, interception, news, parliament, telecommunications by tracey

‘The government has come under fire in the Lords over emergency legislation giving the security services access to people’s phone and internet records.’

Full story

BBC News, 16th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

Comments Off

Assisted dying: leading doctors call on Lords to back legalisation – The Guardian

Posted July 16th, 2014 in assisted suicide, bills, doctors, news, parliament by tracey

‘Twenty-seven leading figures write to every peer urging them to back Lord Falconer’s private members bill on assisted dying.’

Full story

The Guardian, 15th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Emergency surveillance bill clears Commons – The Guardian

‘Controversial emergency surveillance legislation has cleared the Commons after an extended sitting and angry exchanges alleging an abuse of parliament.’

Full story

The Guardian, 16th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Tom Hickman on the DRIP Bill: Plugging Gaps in Surveillance Laws or Authorising the Unlawful? – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘The unveiling last Thursday of a a draft bill on surveillance powers that is to be rushed through Parliament brought to mind the story of the Dutch boy who finds a hole in a dyke on his way to school and puts his finger in it to plug the leak until help arrives to shore it up. The legislation is said to be necessary to plug what the Government regards as holes in the regime of surveillance and investigatory powers pending a full review. The fact that the bill is titled the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Bill – the “DRIP” bill – may mean I am not the first person to draw the analogy. But the analogy may not be entirely apt. An examination of the DRIP Bill reveals that it is not addressing little holes in the regime but in fact profoundly important and substantial issues.’

Full text

UK Constitutional Law Association, 14th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org/blog

Comments Off

Emergency data retention law could fail same tests as the existing law – OUT-LAW.com

Posted July 15th, 2014 in bills, EC law, electronic mail, news, telecommunications by tracey

‘FOCUS: The new law proposed by the UK government to ensure that telecoms companies keep communications data for a year could be challenged in the same way as the court-revoked law it is replacing.’

Full story

OUT-LAW.com, 15th July 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

Comments Off

Finance and Divorce Update – Family Law Week

‘Jessica Craigs, senior solicitor at Mills & Reeve LLP, reviews the latest developments and judgments relating to marriage, divorce and financial remedies.’

Full story

Family Law Week, 11th July 2014

Source: www.familylawweek.co.uk

Comments Off

A life and death question: hopes and fears rise as right to die decision nears – The Guardian

Posted July 14th, 2014 in assisted suicide, bills, criminal justice, doctors, news, parliament by sally

‘The House of Lords is to debate Lord Falconer’s bill aimed at clarifying the law on the right to end one’s life.’

Full story

The Guardian, 12th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

NSA surveillance data: UK access to information faces legal challenge – The Guardian

‘The biggest domestic legal challenge to UK intelligence agencies accessing the mass data harvested by the US National Security Agency (NSA) begins on Monday, and may be one reason behind the government’s decision to introduce emergency surveillance laws into parliament next week, campaigners have suggested.’

Full story

The Guardian, 11th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Emergency data law: What you need to know about the bill that makes ISPs store your data – The Independent

‘The Government has caused uproar this morning by introducing an emergency bill that forces telecom companies to store users’ personal data for 12 months despite the European Union ruling this April that such powers are illegal.’

Full story

The Independent, 10th July 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

Comments Off

Surveillance law wins cross-party support but critics claim stitch-up – The Guardian

‘David Cameron and his Liberal Democrat deputy, Nick Clegg, have unveiled emergency surveillance legislation that will shore up government powers to require phone and internet companies to retain and hand over data to the security services.

Full story

The Guardian, 10th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Emergency surveillance law to be brought in with cross-party support – The Guardian

Posted July 10th, 2014 in bills, EC law, internet, news, privacy, telecommunications by sally

‘Controversial emergency laws will be introduced into the Commons next Monday to reinforce the powers of security services to require phone companies to keep records of their customers’ calls.’

Full story

The Guardian, 10th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Agricultural Sector (Wales) Bill Reference by the Attorney General for England and Wales – Supreme Court

Agricultural Sector (Wales) Bill Reference by the Attorney General for England and Wales [2014] UKSC 43 (YouTube)

Supreme Court, 9th July 2014

Source: www.youtube.com/user/UKSupremeCourt

Comments Off

New judicial review test “risks undermining rule of law”, peers warn – Litigation Futures

Posted July 7th, 2014 in bills, budgets, costs, judges, judicial review, legal aid, news, rule of law by sally

‘The government’s plan to introduce a stricter test on judicial review outcomes “risks undermining the rule of law”, the House of Lords constitution committee has warned.’

Full story

Litigation Futures, 7th July 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

Comments Off

Ministers push for new legislation to track phone usage – The Guardian

‘Ministers are poised to pass emergency laws to require phone companies to log records of phone calls, texts and internet usage, but Labour and Liberal Democrats are warning that they will not allow any new law to become a backdoor route to reinstating a wider “snooper’s charter”.’

Full story

The Guardian, 6th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

Comments Off

Serious Crime Bill: “Cinderella clause” and “Paedophile Manual” – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted July 3rd, 2014 in bills, child cruelty, crime, crime prevention, news, sexual offences by sally

‘Here is a summary of the various minor provisions of the Serious Crime Bill. This is partly a tinkering exercise, but creates two new offences that are far from uncontroversial.’

Full story

Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 2nd July 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

Comments Off

You cannot be serious! Peers call ‘out’ on Government’s judicial review reforms – UK Human Rights Blog

‘Last night saw the House of Lords’ first reaction to the Government’s proposed changes to judicial review as the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill had its second reading. Already dissected at some length in this blog, the proposals have been roundly criticised by both the senior judiciary and the Joint Committee on Human Rights. Consultations responses, including from JUSTICE, expressed concern that the measures appear, by design or coincidence, to undermine the rule of law, inhibit transparency and shield the Government from judicial scrutiny. Two key concerns arise from the Government proposals: restricting access for individuals without substantial means and limiting the courts’ discretion to do justice in the public interest. Yesterday’s debate was robust and eloquent, with former Law Lords joined by bishops and backbenchers alike to condemn the new measures.’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 1st July 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

Comments Off