Bedroom tax and human rights FTT miscellany – NearlyLegal

Posted August 26th, 2014 in appeals, benefits, disabled persons, human rights, news, social security, tribunals by tracey

‘No less than four FTT bedroom tax appeal decision have come my way lately. Three of them concern successful appeals on human rights Article 14 discrimination or Article 8 family life grounds. One is a clear room size decision with an interesting footnote on tenancy agreements.’

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NearlyLegal, 24th August 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Private landlords and article 8 – Are we there yet? – Hardwicke Chambers

Posted August 7th, 2014 in benefits, housing, human rights, landlord & tenant, mortgages, news, repossession by sally

‘At the time of the decisions in Manchester City Council v Pinnock [2011] 2 AC 104 and Hounslow v Powell [2011] 2 AC 186 it was thought that a seismic shock wave would be sent through the Courts requiring them in every claim for possession of residential premises by a public sector landlord to undertake a time consuming balancing exercise to assess the “proportionality” of making an order for possession. The Courts, it was thought, would be overwhelmed. This has in fact not proved to be the case. The County Court has become adept at weeding out the weak cases early on and even where the article 8 point is run to trial the Court has, by and large, been robust in its approach. The one issue which has remained unresolved for a surprisingly long time is the question of the extent to which the principles set out in Powell and Pinnock would apply in a possession claim where the land owner is a private individual and not part of the public sector.’

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Hardwicke Chambers, 4th August 2014

Source: www.hardwicke.co.uk

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Dewsbury couple win spare bedroom housing benefit fight – BBC News

Posted August 7th, 2014 in benefits, disabled persons, housing, news by sally

‘A couple from West Yorkshire who went to court to challenge a cut to their housing benefit have won their case.’

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BBC News, 7th August 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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The gaps in the welfare ‘safety net’ and the scope for using judicial review – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘Desmond Rutledge considers the use of judicial review as a remedy of last resort in welfare benefits cases where the claimant is in financial crisis.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 6th August 2014

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Regina (Winder and others) v Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council (Equality and Human Rights Commission intervening) – WLR Daily

Posted August 1st, 2014 in benefits, council tax, domicile, law reports, local government, news, ultra vires by sally

Regina (Winder and others) v Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council (Equality and Human Rights Commission intervening) [2014] EWHC 2617 (Admin); [2014] WLR (D) 349

‘The provisions of the Local Government Finance Act 1992 did not empower a billing authority for an area to impose a condition of residence on individuals seeking to utilise a council tax reduction scheme created under section 13A(2) of the Act.’

WLR Daily, 30th July 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Local authority’s ‘benefit tourism’ rule discriminated against residents – The Guardian

‘A local authority acted illegally when it introduced strict residency criteria designed to prevent it becoming a magnet for “benefit tourists” priced out of high-cost areas of London and the south-east by welfare reforms, a judge has ruled.’

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The Guardian, 30th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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New measures to tighten up the immigration system – Home Office

‘A new crackdown on immigration abuses was announced today by the Prime Minister and the Home Secretary as part of the government’s long-term economic plan to secure a better future for Britain.’

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Home Office, 29th July 2014

Source: www.gov.uk/home-office

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Another “Bedroom Tax” Challenge Fails – UK Human Rights Blog

‘At the end of May, the High Court ruled that the reduction in Housing Benefit under Regulation B13 of Housing Benefit (Amendment) Regulations – commonly dubbed “the bedroom tax” – did not unlawfully discriminate against a family with a disabled child requiring an additional bedroom for overnight careers because the shortfall was covered by discretionary housing payments.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 4th July 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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High Court challenges UK work schemes – BBC News

Posted July 4th, 2014 in benefits, employment, news, remuneration by tracey

‘The High Court has ruled emergency laws underpinning a government back-to-work scheme are “incompatible” with the European Convention on Human Rights.’

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BBC News, 4th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Temporary accommodation at a peppercorn rent – NearlyLegal

Posted July 3rd, 2014 in benefits, carers, housing, immigration, local government, news, social security by sally

‘This is a fascinating judicial review case. While the specific facts might only apply to a very few people, there is an interesting principle in it which may have wider application.’

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NearlyLegal, 2nd July 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Benefits Street did not breach Ofcom guidelines despite complaints – Daily Telegraph

Posted June 30th, 2014 in benefits, children, complaints, media, news, ombudsmen by sally

‘Controversial Channel 4 show Benefits Street did not breach broadcasting guidelines despite complaints, Ofcom rules.’

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Daily Telegraph, 30th June 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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St Prix v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (AIRE Centre intervening) – WLR Daily

Posted June 24th, 2014 in benefits, EC law, employment, law reports, pregnancy, social security by sally

St Prix v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (AIRE Centre intervening) (Case C-507/12; ECLI:EU:C:2014:2007; [2014] WLR (D) 275

‘A woman who gave up work, or looking for work, because of the physical constraints of the late stages of pregnancy and the aftermath of childbirth retained the status of “worker”, within the meaning of article 45FEU of the FEU Treaty, provided she returned to work or found another job within a reasonable period after the birth of her child.’

WLR Daily, 19th June 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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EU ruling goes against ministers on pregnant benefit claimant – The Guardian

Posted June 20th, 2014 in benefits, domicile, EC law, news, pregnancy, references to European Court by tracey

‘A pregnant French woman, who was denied benefits in the UK because she was not considered to be “a worker”, had been entitled to the payments, the European Court of Justice has ruled. Jessy Saint Prix gave up work as a teaching assistant and was denied income support. Non-UK residents are not entitled to the benefit – unless they have acquired the status of worker in EU law. The case now returns to the Supreme Court for a final ruling.’

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The Guardian, 19th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Watchdog attacks the government’s handling ‘fiasco’ of disability payouts – The Guardian

Posted June 20th, 2014 in benefits, budgets, contracting out, disabled persons, news by tracey

‘The government’s handling of personal independence payments (Pips) has been “nothing short of a fiasco” that has caused distress to thousands of sick and disabled people, parliament’s public spending watchdog has found.’

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The Guardian, 20th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Bootle benefits fraud woman ‘invented’ six children – BBC News

Posted June 17th, 2014 in benefits, fraud, news, sentencing, social security by sally

‘A woman who invented six children in order to claim extra state benefits, has been jailed for a year.’

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BBC News, 16th June 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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On the naughty step: The unacceptable face of London landlords – NearlyLegal

Posted June 13th, 2014 in benefits, housing, landlord & tenant, leases, news, rent, unfair contract terms by sally

‘Some of you, those in London at least, might have noticed Boris Johnson announce a new, and completely voluntary, no compulsion here, landlord accreditation scheme. The idea being that tenants, desperate to find somewhere in the middle of the worst accommodation shortage in London for many, many years, will choose to avoid a ‘non-Boris’ landlord. This is of dubious worth, but no matter, what concerns us here is what followed that announcement. Bear with me, because it is worth it in the end.’

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NearlyLegal, 12th June 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Work capability assessment system at ‘virtual collapse’, says judge – The Guardian

Posted June 11th, 2014 in benefits, disabled persons, legal aid, news, tribunals by sally

‘The outgoing head of the tribunal which hears appeals relating to social security benefits has said that the work capability assessment (WCA) has undergone “virtual collapse” and accused the Department for Work and Pensions of being overly optimistic about the pace at which fit-for-work tests were being carried out.’

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The Guardian, 11th June 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Formerly known as – NearlyLegal

Posted June 9th, 2014 in appeals, benefits, children, disabled persons, housing, news, tribunals by sally

‘Here is an interesting FTT bedroom tax decision from Runcorn, received via RAISE who are clearly doing good work in supporting such appeals.’

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NearlyLegal, 6th June 2014

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Shanks v Unilever plc and others (No 2) – WLR Daily

Posted June 5th, 2014 in benefits, employment, inventions, law reports, patents by sally

Shanks v Unilever plc and others (No 2) [2014] EWHC 1647 (Pat); [2014] WLR (D) 242

‘The time value of money received by an employer following the vesting of an invention by an employee was not a benefit derived by the employer for the purposes of section 41(1) of the Patents Act 1977.’

WLR Daily, 23rd May 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Hines v Lambeth London Borough Council – WLR Daily

Posted June 4th, 2014 in appeals, benefits, carers, children, EC law, families, housing, immigration, law reports by tracey

Hines v Lambeth London Borough Council: [2014] EWCA Civ 660; [2014] WLR (D) 238

‘A person whose right to remain in the United Kingdom had expired and who sought housing assistance under the Housing Act 1996 on the basis of a derivative right of residence as a primary carer of her son, a British citizen, would be entitled to accommodation only if her son would be effectively compelled to leave the United Kingdom if she left.’

WLR Daily, 20th May 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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