White collar crime reform considered – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The attorney general has revealed that the government is considering changing the evidential basis for prosecuting white collar crime.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 20th October 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Dave Lee Travis indecent assault sentence to be reviewed – The Guardian

‘The attorney general’s office is to review the three-month suspended sentence given to the former BBC Radio 1 DJ Dave Lee Travis for indecent assault.’

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The Guardian, 29th September 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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No appeal over Rolf Harris sex offences sentence – BBC News

‘Rolf Harris’s sex offences sentence will not be referred to the Court of Appeal, despite 150 complaints over its “leniency”, the attorney general’s office has said.’

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BBC News, 30th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Ann Sherlock: Supreme Court ruling on Welsh legislation – UK Constitutional Law Association

‘On 9 July 2014, the Supreme Court delivered its unanimous ruling that the Agricultural Sector (Wales) Bill was within the legislative competence of the National Assembly for Wales.’

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UK Constitutional Law Association, 30th July 2014

Source: www.ukconstitutionallaw.org

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Lady Butler-Sloss stands down from child-abuse inquiry – The Guardian

‘Lady Butler-Sloss, the retired high court judge, has resigned as chair of the panel that is due to examine the extent to which public institutions failed to investigate allegations of child abuse.

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The Guardian, 14th July 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Rolf Harris jail sentence to be reviewed by attorney general – The Guardian

‘Rolf Harris’s prison sentence has been referred to the attorney general for being unduly lenient, it has emerged.’

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The Guardian, 4th July 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Attorney General’s concern over ‘unworkable’ cases – Daily Telegraph

‘Attorney General Dominic Grieve to review Crown Prosecution Service’s procedure following Nigel Evans’ failed prosecution.;

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Daily Telegraph, 13th April 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Attorney general resists call to protect witnesses from court cross-examination – The Guardian

Posted April 8th, 2014 in attorney general, children, cross-examination, judiciary, news, trials, witnesses by sally

‘Dominic Grieve QC, the attorney general, has resisted calls for young and vulnerable witnesses to be cross-examined by a judge rather than several barristers to avoid aggressive courtroom questioning .’

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The Guardian, 7th April 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Prince Charles, the Guardian and the Unreasonable Veto – Panopticon

‘As promised last week, this post contains a slightly fuller account of the Court of Appeal’s judgment in R (Evans) v HM Attorney General [2014] EWCA Civ 254. The history of the case is manifold and has been covered on this blog innumerable times (see: here, here and here). In essence, the Upper Tribunal held in a very lengthy judgment that some of the correspondence written by Prince Charles to various governmental departments ought to be disclosed in the public interest. The Attorney General then issued his statement of reasons under section 53 FOIA, which has the effect of vetoing the judicial decision. On any view, the veto is a highly unusual provision. The Divisional Court dismissed the judicial review of that veto. Mr Evans, a Guardian journalist, appealed.’

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Panopticon, 18th March 2014

Source: www.panopticonblog.com

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Regina (Evans) v Attorney General – WLR Daily

Regina (Evans) v Attorney General; [2014] EWCA Civ 254;  [2014] WLR (D)  124

‘The issue of a certificate by the Attorney General, an accountable person under the Freedom of Information Act 2000, of a certificate under section 53(2) of the Act so as to override and render ineffective a decision of an independent and impartial tribunal required more than that he merely disagreed with the tribunal’s determination. Examples of what would suffice were that there had been a material change of circumstances since the tribunal’s decision or that it was clearly flawed in fact or in law.’

WLR Daily, 12th March 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Prince Charles letters: attorney general acted unlawfully, say senior judges – The Guardian

‘Three senior judges have ruled that Dominic Grieve, the attorney general, acted unlawfully when he blocked the publication of letters written by Prince Charles to government ministers. The ruling, led by Lord Dyson, the head of the civil judiciary in England and Wales, paves the way for the release of the letters which reveal how the prince lobbied government ministers to change official policies.’

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The Guardian, 12th March 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Attorney General considers whether single punch killing sentence was ‘too lenient’ – Daily Telegraph

‘Dominic Grieve, the Attorney General, will decide whether to refer the four-year jail term given to Lewis Gill for the killing of Andrew Young in Bournemouth to the Court of Appeal.’

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Daily Telegraph, 26th February 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Judge asks attorney general to intervene in VHCCs – Law Society’s Gazette

‘The attorney general is considering intervening to appoint an amicus curiae to assist the court on legal arguments expected to be made on behalf of defendants facing trial without representation in court, the Gazette can reveal.’

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Law Society’s Gazette, 25th February 2014

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Decision to block Prince Charles’s letters challenged – BBC News

Posted February 25th, 2014 in appeals, attorney general, disclosure, freedom of information, news, royal family, veto by sally

‘A move by the government to block the release of letters from Prince of Wales to ministers are being challenged in the Court of Appeal.’

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BBC News, 24th February 2014

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Whole-life sentences ‘can be imposed despite European court’s objections’ – The Guardian

Posted January 27th, 2014 in appeals, attorney general, human rights, news, sentencing by sally

‘Whole-life sentences can still be imposed on serious and serial offenders despite objections from the European court of human rights, the court of appeal has been told.’

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The Guardian, 24th January 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Attorney General “warned LSB about regulatory creep” but indicates no roll-back of Clementi – Legal Futures

‘The Attorney General has warned about the “danger” of regulators micro-managing the legal profession, but also indicated that the government is unlikely to roll back the Clementi reforms that led to the creation of independent regulators.’

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Legal Futures, 23rd January 2014

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Court of Appeal finds 25 year murder sentence unduly lenient – Attorney General’s Office

Posted January 17th, 2014 in appeals, attorney general, murder, news, sentencing by sally

‘Minimum term of Glenn Nelson increased to 30 years for murder of Krishnamaya Mabo.’

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Attorney General’s Office, 16th January 2014

Source: www.gov.uk/ago

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In defence of the jury trial – Attorney General’s Office

Posted December 13th, 2013 in attorney general, juries, news, speeches, trials by sally

‘Speech on the jury system and the challenges it faces, given as part of Politeia’s justice series.’

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Attorney General’s Office, 12th December 2013

Source: www.gov.uk/ago

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How to tweet without ending up in prison – The Guardian

‘An ill-judged tweet can land you in a whole lot of legal bother, as Peaches Geldof and Sally Bercow know only too well. So the attorney general’s new guidelines are essential reading.’

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The Guardian, 4th December 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Jurors who search web during cases could be jailed under new proposals – The Guardian

‘Jurors should face up to two years in prison if they search the internet for information about cases beyond what is revealed in court, the Law Commission has recommended.’

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The Guardian, 9th December 2013

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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