MoD censured over soldier’s death on Lydd range – BBC News

Posted September 30th, 2016 in armed forces, firearms, health & safety, inquests, news, statutory duty by tracey

‘The Ministry of Defence has been censured over the death of a soldier who was shot in the neck during a training exercise.
Fusilier Dean Griffiths, 21, of First Battalion the Royal Welsh, died at Lydd Range, Kent in September 2011.’

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BBC News, 29th September 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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The Human Rights Act protects our soldiers – as well as those they protect – The Guardian

Posted September 22nd, 2016 in armed forces, human rights, news, war by sally

‘Tom Tugendhat is wrong. Limiting human rights to our borders will strip soldiers of hard-won protections, and values that distinguish them from the enemy.’

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The Guardian, 21st September 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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How often must we investigate torture? – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted September 21st, 2016 in appeals, armed forces, detention, human rights, Iraq, news, torture, war by tracey

‘Al-Saadoon & Ors v. Secretary of State for Defence [2016] EWCA Civ 811, 9 September 2016. This post concerns the extent of any obligations imposed on the UK to investigate violations of non-refoulement (under Article 3, ECHR) and arbitrary deprivation of liberty (Article 5, ECHR). The non-refoulement issue arose from two individuals whom had been captured by British forces in Iraq claimed they were transferred to American custody and subsequently ill-treated. The Article 5 issue arose from the detention by British forces in Iraq of several individuals who claimed to have had their Article 5 rights violated whilst in British custody.’

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UK Human Rights Blog, 20th September 2016

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Theresa May will not allow an ‘industry of vexatious allegations’ against British troops over claims of abuse in Iraq – The Independent

Posted September 21st, 2016 in armed forces, inquiries, Iraq, murder, news, torture by tracey

‘Theresa May has made clear she will not allow an “industry of vexatious allegations” against British troops over claims of abuse in Iraq. But the Prime Minister refused to bow to pressure and dismantle the Government body, the Iraq Historic Allegations Team (IHAT), which is handling approximately 1,500 allegations of murder, abuse and torture carried out by British soldiers.’

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The Independent, 21st September 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Soldiers facing prosecution for Iraq drowning were cleared a decade ago after witnesses were shown to have lied – Daily Telegraph

Posted September 19th, 2016 in armed forces, homicide, Iraq, news, prosecutions, witnesses by tracey

‘Three servicemen who face being prosecuted for manslaughter over the death of an Iraqi teenager were cleared a decade ago, after it emerged that key witnesses had lied about the claims and were paid expenses in exchange for their testimony.’

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Daily Telegraph, 18th September 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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The Iraq Fatality Investigations: report into the death of Ahmed Jabbar Kareem Ali – official-documents.gov.uk

Posted September 16th, 2016 in armed forces, Iraq, reports, war by tracey

‘The report records the outcome of the fourth investigation into civilian deaths referred to the Iraq Fatalities Investigations by the Secretary of State for Defence.’

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official-documents.gov.uk, 15th September 2016

Source: www.official-documents.gov.uk

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Iraq abuse claims ‘often very poor’ says former DPP – Daily Telegraph

‘Alleged Iraq abuse claims brought against British troops by a leading human rights law firm have often been made up of poor, inaccurate information, a review by a former director of public prosecutions has said. Sir David Calvert-Smith said investigators tasked with wading through hundreds of alleged abuse claims had found key details such as names, dates and times were often wrong.’

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Daily Telegraph, 15th September 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Four British soldiers ‘forced Iraqi teenager into river where he drowned’ – The Independent

Posted September 16th, 2016 in armed forces, death in custody, homicide, Iraq, news, reports, war, young persons by tracey

‘The Ministry of Defence has said it is “extremely sorry” for the death of an Iraqi teenager who drowned after being “forced” into a Basra canal by four British soldiers.’

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The Independent, 16th September 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Army veteran Tasered by police awarded £50,000 compensation – The Guardian

‘An army veteran has been paid £50,000 in compensation by Bedfordshire police after he was Tasered while suffering a flashback triggered by post-traumatic stress disorder.’

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The Guardian, 15th September 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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War & peace: the importance of applying the rule of law to the military – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

Posted September 12th, 2016 in armed forces, human rights, law firms, news, war by sally

‘The news last month that Public Interest Lawyers, the firm which brought a host of discredited cases alleging abuse by British serviceman in Iraq, is to be wound up has been met with applause by the press and service community. These claims culminated in the Al Sweady Inquiry which considered allegations of war crimes and abuse by British troops in Iraq in 2004. The allegations were found to be “baseless” and claims of torture and murder were “wholly without foundation” and “entirely the product of deliberate lies, reckless speculation and ingrained hostility” from some Iraqi witnesses. It has prompted calls for the suspension of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) on the “battlefield” and a general attack on lawyers meddling or challenging affairs involving “war”. That reaction is understandable; however, it would be an enormous mistake to conclude that the law only interferes with the military doing its job.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 7th September 2016

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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Defending public interest lawyers – Halsbury’s Law Exchange

‘After months of rumours that staff were leaving the firm and that its founder Phil Shiner was buckling under of the pressure, Public Interest Lawyers (PIL) has announced its closure.’

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Halsbury’s Law Exchange, 30th August 2016

Source: www.halsburyslawexchange.co.uk

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How to tell a shining knight of a lawyer from an ambulance chaser? – The Guardian

Posted August 17th, 2016 in armed forces, asylum, law firms, legal aid, news, public interest by sally

‘The question takes us straight to this week’s reported news that Phil Shiner’s Public Interest Lawyers is having to close.’

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The Guardian, 16th August 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Iraq War: Public Interest Lawyers closes down – BBC News

‘The law firm Public Interest Lawyers, which submitted multiple allegations of misconduct by British troops during the Iraq War, is to close.’

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BBC News, 15th August 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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Hundreds of compensation claims against British soldiers could be abandoned after controversial law firm announces closure – Daily Telegraph

‘Hundreds of compensation claims against British soldiers are likely to be abandoned after a controversial law firm accused of “hounding” troops announced that it is closing.’

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Daily Telegraph, 15th August 2016

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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London woman dies in possibly the first drone-related accidental death – The Independent

Posted August 10th, 2016 in accidents, aircraft, armed forces, news, police, prisons, road traffic, terrorism by tracey

‘A young woman died in a car crash Tuesday after her vehicle was followed by police investigating reports of a drone being flown near Wandsworth Prison in London. The incident may be the first fatality linked to the non-military use of drones.’

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The Independent, 9th August 2016

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Five things you may have missed about the Chilcot inquiry – The Guardian

‘Much of the furore surrounding the Iraq war report focused on the failings of Tony Blair. But there were other, crucial findings that shouldn’t be ignored.’

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The Guardian, 26th July 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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A Grand and Disastrous Deceit – London Review of Books

Posted July 22nd, 2016 in armed forces, inquiries, Iraq, news, war by sally

‘The Iraq Inquiry, chaired by Sir John Chilcot and composed of five privy councillors, finally published its report on the morning of 6 July, seven years and 21 days after it was established by Gordon Brown with a remit to ‘look at the run-up to the conflict, the conflict itself and the reconstruction, so that we can learn lessons’.​ It offers a long and painful account of an episode that may come to be seen as marking the moment when the UK fell off its global perch, trust in government collapsed and the country turned inward and began to disintegrate.’

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London Review of Books, 28th July 2016

Source: www.lrb.co.uk

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Defence firms claimed £61m of ‘non-allowable’ costs, says watchdog – BBC News

Posted July 14th, 2016 in armed forces, contracting out, contracts, costs, defence, expenses, news by tracey

‘Defence companies have claimed £61m of expenditure from the taxpayer that was “potentially” not allowed under contract rules, a watchdog has said.’

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BBC News, 14th July 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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The Armed Services and the Conflict of Laws: What Law Applies to Services Personnel Injured Abroad? – Old Square Chambers

‘In Rai v Ministry of Defence (HH Judge Mark Gargan sitting as a Deputy High Court Judge, judgment handed down on 9 May 2016), the Court had to determine whether the Rome II Regulation 864/2007 applied and to identify what was the proper law of the tort (Alberta law being the law of the place of the accident, or English law). The Claimant was a serving Ghurkha who, as part of Adventurous Training, was sent to Canada. In Canada he received training provided by a Canadian company (“Lazy H Trail Limited”) contracted to provide services, under a contract governed by Alberta law, for the benefit of the British Army. The circumstances of the accident were that the Claimant was kicked by a horse on the first day of training, as he attempted to clean the horse’s hoof, thereby suffering a head injury. The Claimant brought a claim for breach of a non-delegable duty of care in negligence against the Ministry of Defence.’

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Old Square Chambers, 16th June 2016

Source: www.oldsquare.co.uk

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Plan to enable prosecution of MoD over training deaths rejected – The Guardian

Posted July 11th, 2016 in armed forces, corporate manslaughter, news, prosecutions by sally

‘The government has rejected a proposed legal change that would have allowed for the Ministry of Defence to be prosecuted for corporate manslaughter over deaths during hazardous training such as the SAS exercise on the Brecon Beacons that claimed the lives of three reservists.’

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The Guardian, 10th July 2016

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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