‘Background’ trade marks may be valid even if never used as registered , UK court rules – OUT-LAW.com

Posted October 17th, 2014 in appeals, EC law, news, trade marks by tracey

‘Wordless logo trade marks that are never used in isolation can defeat a legal challenge brought on the basis that they have never been used, a UK court has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 16th October 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Court of Appeal: employer not in breach of duty of care by beginning disciplinary proceedings – OUT-LAW.com

Posted October 17th, 2014 in appeals, disciplinary procedures, duty of care, employment, news, universities by tracey

‘A university did not breach its duty of care towards an employee by beginning disciplinary proceedings against her after what the employee argued was an inadequate investigation, the Court of Appeal in England and Wales has ruled.’

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OUT-LAW.com, 16th October 2014

Source: www.out-law.com

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Regina (Detention Action) v Secretary of State for the Home Department – WLR Daily

Posted October 17th, 2014 in appeals, asylum, detention, immigration, news, time limits by tracey

Regina (Detention Action) v Secretary of State for the Home Department: [2014] EWCA Civ 1270; [2014] WLR (D) 426

‘All those subject to the Detained Fast Track policy, operated by the Secretary of State, for the detention of some asylum seekers while their asylum claims were being determined would now have four clear working days from allocation of a lawyer to substantive interview.’

WLR Daily, 9th October 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Tchenguiz v Director of the Serious Fraud Office and others – WLR DAily

Posted October 17th, 2014 in appeals, civil procedure rules, fraud, law reports, practice directions by tracey

Tchenguiz v Director of the Serious Fraud Office and others: [2014] EWCA Civ 1333; [2014] WLR (D) 427

‘It was very difficult for the Court of Appeal to deal with the dispatch of its business if it was faced with excessively lengthy skeleton arguments. What was required was a careful and concise summary of the points that were intended to be addressed.’

WLR Daily, 13th October 2014

Source: www.iclr.co.uk

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Grayling gives green light for staff to use force against inmates in new jail – The Guardian

‘Chris Grayling is to defy an appeal court judgement and order that staff should be able to use force to restrain teenage inmates for “the purposes of good order and discipline” at his proposed £85m privately run “super-child jail.” The proposed rule for the justice secretary’s 320-place “secure college” comes despite a court of appeal ruling in 2008 which banned the use of force after it was linked to the deaths and injury of several children in custody, including the death of a 14-year-old Gareth Myatt.’

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The Guardian, 16th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Home Office told to disclose advice behind decision on intercept evidence – The Guardian

‘The Home Office has been ordered to release secret legal advice justifying its decision to prevent intercept evidence being used in criminal trials. The ruling by an information tribunal could shine a light on the way intelligence agencies gather and store material as well as on their relationship with law enforcement organisations. The appeal for the advice to be disclosed was made by the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law which submitted a Freedom of Information request to uncover the reasoning behind a 2009 report, entitled “Intercept as Evidence”.’

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The Guardian, 16th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Authors’ concerns after court rules writer can’t publish sex abuse memoir – Daily Telegraph

‘Leading authors have expressed their “grave concern” at a court ruling which has prevented a writer from publishing a book dealing with the sexual abuse he suffered as a child. The author’s ex-wife has obtained a temporary injunction stopping the memoir’s release until the issue has been decided at trial. She argued that reading it would cause their 11 year-old son, who suffers from a number of disabilities, severe psychological harm.’

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Daily Telegraph, 16th October 2014

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

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Director of Public Prosecutions responds to Supreme Court on assisted suicide policy – Crown Prosecution Service

‘The Director of Public Prosecutions has today clarified the CPS Policy on cases of encouraging or assisting suicide in light of the recent comments of the Supreme Court in the case of Nicklinson and others.’

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Crown Prosecution Service, 16th October 2014

Source: www.cps.gov.uk

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Court of Appeal fires warning over lengthy skeleton arguments – Litigation Futures

Posted October 16th, 2014 in appeals, courts, delay, news by sally

‘Lord Justice Jackson has led the Court of Appeal in issuing a stark warning to advocates over submitting lengthy skeleton arguments, with his fellow judges making it clear that there will be no special treatment of Commercial Court litigation.’

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Litigation Futures, 16th October 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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To litigate or not to litigate in claims involving wills: practical points for charities – New Square Chambers

Posted October 15th, 2014 in animals, appeals, charities, families, news, wills by sally

My purpose in this article is to highlight the sort of issues facing charities in deciding whether or not to litigate over a legacy, or residuary gift, contained in a Will. In particular, I shall be looking at a number of cases where charities have faced such difficult decisions, some of which they have got wrong.

Full story (PDF)

New Square Chambers, 2nd October 2014

Source: www.newsquarechambers.co.uk

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The Costs of Complexity: A Practical View from the Bar – Littleton Chambers

Posted October 15th, 2014 in appeals, costs, human rights, news, nuisance, Supreme Court by sally

‘In his monthly column, originally published by PLC, James Bickford Smith considers the Supreme Court’s judgments in Coventry v Lawrence (No 2) [2014] UKSC 46 and Marley v Rawlings [2014] UKSC 51, before commenting briefly on relief from sanctions disputes after Denton v White and other appeals [2014] EWCA Civ 906.’

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Littleton Chambers, 3rd October 2014

Source: www.littletonchambers.com

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Rectification of Wills Following Marley v Rawlings – No. 5 Chambers

Posted October 15th, 2014 in appeals, documents, news, rectification, Supreme Court, wills by sally

‘David Mtichell, member of No5 Chambers Commercial & Chancery Group, recently gave a talk titled ‘Rectification of Wills Following Marley v Rawlings’ at the No5 Estates Seminar held on 25th September.’

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No. 5 Chambers, 15th October 2014

Source: www.no5.com

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Mark Duggan’s family lose attempt to overturn inquest verdict – The Guardian

Posted October 14th, 2014 in appeals, coroners, inquests, jury directions, news, self-defence, unlawful killing by sally

‘The family of Mark Duggan have lost their attempt to overturn an inquest verdict that the police shooting of their loved one was a lawful killing.’

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The Guardian, 14th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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Jackson rules on causing psychological harm by intentional statement – Litigation Futures

Posted October 14th, 2014 in appeals, children, injunctions, judges, news, psychiatric damage by sally

‘Lord Justice Jackson has joined two other Court of Appeal judges in ruling that publication of a book detailing a father’s sexual abuse at school could amount to deliberately causing psychological harm to his son under the principles set out in an “obscure tort”.’

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Litigation Futures, 14th October 2014

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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The Supreme Court and the Rule of Law – Speech by Lord Neuberger

The Supreme Court and the Rule of Law (PDF)

Lord Neuberger

The Conkerton Lecture 2014, Liverpool Law Society, 9th October 2014

Source: www.supremecourt.uk

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Consultation process not unfair after all, says Court of Appeal – UK Human Rights Blog

Posted October 13th, 2014 in appeals, consultations, news, statutory duty by sally

‘Deciding whether a given consultation process conducted prior to some administrative decision was or was not sufficiently unfair to warrant challenge is not an easy task. Three connected problems commonly arise:

(1) did the public body provide adequate information to enable properly informed consultation

(2) was the consultation at a formative stage of the decision-making process, so it was a real rather than sham process?

(3) did the consultation encompass sufficient alternatives?’

Full story

UK Human Rights Blog, 12th October 2014

Source: www.ukhumanrightsblog.com

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Fathers 4 Justice couple lose injunction claim – The Independent

Posted October 13th, 2014 in appeals, costs, evidence, harassment, injunctions, news by sally

‘The couple behind the pressure group Fathers4Justice who claimed a former lobbyist was harassing them have had an application for an injunction against him dismissed due to “a total absence of evidence”.’

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The Independent, 10th October 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Lord Neuberger on the Supreme Court: Five key cases from its first five years – The Independent

‘From euthanasia to high-speed rail, the highest in the land has an almost limitless remit.’

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The Independent, 12th October 2014

Source: www.independent.co.uk

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Appeal court reserves judgment on Max Clifford’s appeal against sentence – The Guardian

Posted October 10th, 2014 in appeals, news, sentencing, sexual offences by sally

‘The appeal court has reserved judgment on an appeal by the publicist Max Clifford against the length of his eight-year jail sentence for sex offences.’

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The Guardian, 9th October 2014

Source: www.guardian.co.uk

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QASA ruling: barristers ‘should not only be independent but competent’ – LegalVoice

Posted October 10th, 2014 in advocacy, appeals, barristers, judicial review, Legal Services Board, news by sally

‘The Court of Appeal has unanimously rejected the appeal of criminal barristers arguing that QASA (the Quality Assurance Scheme for Advocates) was unlawful. It was argued that the scheme compromised the independence of advocates and that the decision on the part of the Legal Services Board (LSB) to approve it was unlawful. All grounds were quashed and implementation is now due to take place some eight years after the original proposals were tabled.’

Full story

LegalVoice, 9th October 2014

Source: www.legalvoice.org.uk

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