‘Solicitor’s agents’ yet again – no rights of audience? – Nearly Legal

‘What is more, there is updated guidance from the Bar Council to ‘unregistered barristers acting as solicitor’s agents’ (ie, barristers who have been called, even passed the BPTC, but do not have pupillage or have qualified). The effect of which is that “many individuals currently exercising rights of audience in reliance on this provision (Sch 3 Legal Services Act 2007) are at risk of contravening the Act”. Which is a potentially criminal offence.’

Full story

Nearly Legal, 29th January 2017

Source: www.nearlylegal.co.uk

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Junior advocates lose out to QCs in new fees regime – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted January 6th, 2017 in advocacy, barristers, fees, news, queen's counsel by tracey

‘The Law Society has criticised the Ministry of Justice’s proposals for reforming advocacy fees, warning that junior barristers and solicitor-advocates will lose out while QCs enjoy a pay hike.’

Full story

Law Society’s Gazette, 5th January 2017

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Proposals to reform criminal defence advocates pay published – Ministry of Justice

Posted January 6th, 2017 in advocacy, barristers, fees, legal aid, press releases by tracey

‘Plans to introduce a simpler and fairer pay system for defence advocates who work on legal aid-funded criminal cases have been unveiled today by the Ministry of Justice.’

Full press release

ministry of Justice, 5th January 2017

Source: www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ministry-of-justice

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New AGFS plan will mean fairer pay for advocates – The Bar Council

Posted January 6th, 2017 in advocacy, barristers, fees, legal aid, press releases by tracey

‘The Bar Council and the Young Barristers’ Committee welcome new proposals published today by the Ministry of Justice which will mean barristers and other advocates will be paid fairly for the work they do in publicly funded criminal cases. The new, fairer Advocates’ Graduated Fee Scheme (AGFS), if implemented, will mean barristers’ fees are no longer based on outdated and distorting factors such as the number of pages in a case, but instead are paid according to the seriousness and complexity of the work.’

Full press release

The Bar Council, 5th January 2017

Source: www.barcouncil.org.uk

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CBA chairman on solicitor-advocates: “The label matters less than the content of the bottle” – Legal Futures

Posted November 22nd, 2016 in advocacy, legal profession, news, solicitor advocates, speeches by sally

‘The chairman of the Criminal Bar Association (CBA) yesterday tried to cool emotions after former Lord Chancellor Michael Gove’s criticism of solicitor-advocates, saying that “the label matters less than the content of the bottle”.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 22nd November 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Direct access website founder urges barristers to focus on broader expertise, not advocacy – Legal Futures

Posted October 11th, 2016 in advocacy, barristers, legal services, news by sally

‘Lawyers who don’t believe the “writing is on the wall” that unregulated legal services will increase “may find themselves on the wrong side of history”, the founder of direct access website Absolute Barrister has warned.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 11th October 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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New advocates lack “basic knowledge” of ethical rules, report finds – Legal Futures

‘Significant numbers of new advocates are “weaker than might be hoped on basic knowledge” of ethical rules, a major report has found.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 5th October 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Criminal bar chief targets ‘corruption’ of defence work – Law Society’s Gazette

Posted September 26th, 2016 in advocacy, barristers, criminal justice, news by sally

‘The leader of the criminal bar has urged the government to get on with advocacy reforms to fix a sector troubled by corruption and poor business models.’

Full story

Law Society’s Gazette, 23rd September 2016

Source: www.lawgazette.co.uk

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Be upstanding in court! – Counsel

Posted July 27th, 2016 in advocacy, barristers, complementary medicine, news by sally

‘Optimise performance and manage stress – John Hunter outlines the benefits of the Alexander Technique to the Bar.’

Full story

Counsel, August 2016

Source: www.counselmagazine.co.uk

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Fees fi fo fum – New Law Journal

Posted July 27th, 2016 in advocacy, appeals, civil procedure rules, costs, courts, damages, fees, news by sally

‘David Wright discusses fixed advocacy fees.’

Full story

New Law Journal, 26th July 2016

Source: www.newlawjournal.co.uk

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Court of Appeal: no room for “grandiloquent, rhetorical” advocacy in modern trials – Legal Futures

Posted July 8th, 2016 in advocacy, appeals, barristers, benefits, fraud, news by sally

‘The “grandiloquent, rhetorical and at times almost facetious” advocacy style of a criminal defence barrister has no place in modern trials, the Court of Appeal has said.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 8th July 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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What to expect from the new criminal legal aid contracts – Legal Voice

Posted June 23rd, 2016 in advocacy, contracts, criminal justice, legal aid, news, solicitors by sally

‘Richard Miller explains what may be in store when the new criminal legal aid contracts come into force next year.’

Full story

Legal Voice, 23rd June 2016

Source: www.legalvoice.org.uk

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Neuberger urges debate over ethical implications of artificial intelligence – Legal Futures

‘The president of the Supreme Court last week called for a debate on the ethical implications of artificial intelligence (AI) and for “greater prominence” for ethics in legal training.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 20th June 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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They think they’ve got away: How to catch a historical sex offender – BBC News

‘Sex offenders think they’ll get away with it. And often they do. Sometimes it can take years to bring them to justice, while others escape retribution altogether. So how do you go about making sure perpetrators of horrendous crimes committed in the distant past are caught and convicted?’

Full story

BBC News, 20th June 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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A Dead Parrot Or A Sleeping Beauty? – The 36 Group

Posted June 2nd, 2016 in advocacy, compensation, divorce, financial provision, news by sally

‘Baroness Hale was primarily responsible for the introduction of compensation (SRJ v DWJ [1999] 2 FLR 176). She is a fine lawyer and judge, but she was only briefly an advocate. I am no judge at all with a degree in English, but I have argued a lot of cases. Whilst doing so I have appeared against some outstanding advocates such as Lord Wilson, the late Mrs Justice Baron, Mr Justice Mostyn and Mr Martin Pointer QC. As advocates they looked and in the case of Martin, look to persuade the court. I believe that in presenting a wife’s arguments they would all have rejected submitting that she should be compensated for gender related disadvantage. They would have done so for various reasons. Compensation is a dangerous word as it has its most natural and best established use in the law of tort. It is also manifestly insensitive. Any husband who has maintained his wife and children for, say fifteen years will be hurt and annoyed by the proposition that he should compensate his wife for the experience. He may, or may not be placated by the subsequent reference to gender related disadvantage. At least that shows compensation is a systemic concept, rather than directed at him personally. But fully expressed the words display the origin of the concept in a feminist approach to divorce. The advocate would know that some tribunals would reject the socio-legal concept; if only because another feminist analysis would give primacy to the wife’s autonomous ability to look after.’

Full story

The 36 Group, 18th May 2016

Source: www.36group.co.uk

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Rule committee “sympathetic” with PIBA complaints about solicitors using unregistered barristers in court – Litigation Futures

‘The government has been asked to look at changing the Civil Procedure Rules to prevent solicitors from employing unregistered barristers as agents to represent clients in court.’

Full story

Litigation Futures, 27th May 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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High Court: no “windfall” in allowing barrister to claim fast-track trial advocacy fee – Litigation Futures

‘Allowing a claimant’s barrister to recover a trial advocacy fee in a fast-track personal injury case, settled on the morning of the hearing, “hardly amounts to a windfall”, a High Court judge has said.’

Full story

Litigation Futures, 3rd May 2016

Source: www.litigationfutures.com

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Hillsborough inquests: Michael Mansfield on ‘far-reaching consequences’ – BBC News

Posted April 29th, 2016 in advocacy, bereavement, health & safety, inquests, news, sport by tracey

‘Leading barrister Michael Mansfield QC, who represented most of the victims’ families at the Hillsborough Inquests, has called for the creation of a permanent commission scrutinising how the police and other agencies handle crime scenes. Here he writes how the precedent of the inquests could have far-reaching consequences for the investigation of future disasters.’

Full story

BBC News, 29th April 2016

Source: www.bbc.co.uk

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“Boring” hearings or judges who interrupt? Neuberger knows what he likes – Legal Futures

‘The written advocacy of continental European lawyers makes for “boring” court proceedings, according to the President of the Supreme Court.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 19th April 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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Judges should be able to decline ‘unfair’ QASA evaluations, SRA says – Legal Futures

Posted January 26th, 2016 in advocacy, judges, news, quality assurance, Solicitors Regulation Authority by sally

‘Judges should be able to opt out of assessing advocates under the Quality Assurance Scheme for Advocates (QASA) if they believe it would be unfair, the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) has said.’

Full story

Legal Futures, 26th January 2016

Source: www.legalfutures.co.uk

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